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Walker 1830
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NOTES from WALKER'S MAP of SE ENGLAND, 1830

FA2000.1  
These notes are taken from the map of England, plate 5, south east, by J and C Walker, published for the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, by Baldwin and Cradock, 47 Paternoster Row, London, 1830. The map studied is in the Map Collection of Hampshire CC Museums Service, item HMCMS:FA2000.1
map type: HantsMap & Walker 1830
The map size is: wxh, sheet = 41x34.5cm; wxh, map = 376x261mm. Remember that these notes are written with a strong bias toward Hampshire interest; in particular some map features which are not noted here might be present in other areas of the map.

MAP FEATURES

title    
map maker    

Printed lower right:-
ENGLAND V Published under the Superintendence of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge.
Printed bottom centre:-
Published by Baldwin & Cradock 47 Paternoster Row June 25th. 1830.
Printed bottom right:-
J. & C. Walker, Sculpt.

orientation    
up is N    

The map's orientation is 'obvious'. The map is printed with North at the top of the sheet.

scale line    
scale    

Printed lower right, below the title is a scale of:-
Statute Miles 69.1 = One Degree
The scale has a leftward portion of 10 miles marked at 1 mile intervals, labelled 0,5,10, and the main portion marked and labelled at 5 mile intervals. The 10+30 miles= 83.9 mm gives a scale 1 to 767268. The map scale is about:-
1 to 770000
12 miles to 1 inch

lat and long scales    
lat and long grid    

Printed in the map borders are scales of latitude and longitude for a conical projection; chequered at 5 minute intervals, labelled at degrees. The prime meridian is labelled:-
0 / Meridian of Greenwich
A latitude and longitude grid, a graticule, is printed over the map at degree intervals.
The map includes most of Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire, Essex, Middlesex, London, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Dorset, Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Surrey, West Sussex, East Sussex, and Kent.

sea area    
sea plain    
sandbanks    

The sea area is plain; some sea areas are labelled, eg:-
ENGLISH CHANNEL
SPITHEAD
Southampton Water
Large sandbanks, or shallows, might be drawn in dotted outline, as off Selsey Bill, labelled:-
Owers

coast line    
coast shaded    
lighthouses    
islands    

image snip from map

The coast is shaded or hachured on the landward side, further emphasised by the tinting of the county boundaries. Although headlands, harbours, etc are clearly drawn, none are labelled for Hampshire. Further east a headland and lighthouse:-
Beachy Head
Revolving Light
are labelled.
Heyling I.
is labelled.

relief    
hill hachuring    

image snip from map

Some relief is indicated by hill hachuring. The South Downs and North Hampshire Downs are suggested amongst a few other hills.

rivers    
image snip from map

Rivers are drawn by a wiggly line tapering inland; braiding might be suggested. Some rivers are labelled, eg:-
Riv. Stour
Wily River
The second of these is the River Avon, to which the River Wylye is a tributary joining at Salisbury.
All of Hampshire's main river systems are drawn, with some tributaries. Bridges are not noticed, only implied where a road crosses and interrupts a stream.

woods    
forests    

image snip from map

A few areas of woodland are shown by a few tree symbols and dotting to suggest rough ground. The only woodland area marked in Hampshire is the:-
NEW FOREST

parks    
image snip from map

A very few parks are drawn in outline with fence palings, not labelled.

county    
image snip from map

The county boundaries are dotted lines emphasised by tinting for each county, ie there might be a tint each side of the boundary line, one for each county. The county areas are labelled, eg:-
HAMPSHIRE
The detached part of Hampshire is shown within West Sussex, not labelled, but tinted to match Hampshire. Notice also the two detached parts of Wiltshire in Berkshire, on Hampshire's north border.
The county colouring is only really worth studying for the whole sheet, nevertheless the colours around Hampshire, which is red, are: Dorset yellow, Wiltshire green, Berkshire yellow, Surrey lilac, Sussex yellow. Detached parts appear to match their county tint.

settlements    
Settlements are marked by a circle and dot, or just a smaller circle, differentiated by style of lettering.
city     dot and circle; labelled in upright block caps, eg:-
image snip from map

WINCHESTER

town     dot and circle; labelled in upright lowercase text, eg:-
image snip from map

Alton
Southampton
except:-
PORTSMOUTH
in upright block caps - it's an important place.

village     circle, smaller and no dot; labelled in italic lowercase text, eg:-
image snip from map

Upper Wallop
E. Worldham


roads    
image snip from map

A network of roads is drawn by double lines. Road are graded: major roads, perhaps turnpikes, broader and one line bold; minor roads narrower.

canals    
Canals are drawn by a bold curvy line, perhaps labelled. The following canals can be seen in Hampshire:-
Basingstoke Canal     from Basingstoke eastwards, crossing Surrey to the River Wey:-
image snip from map

Basingstoke Canal

Andover Canal     from Andover to Redbridge.

Salisbury and Southampton Canal     from Alderbury, just short of Salisbury, to join the Andover Canal near Mottisfont; but not to Southampton.



Hampshire Towns

The '21' market towns of Hampshire are all shown, their names spelt mostly as today.
 
Alton
Andover
Basingstoke
Bishops Waltham
Christ Church
Fareham
Fordingbridge
Gosport
Havant
Kingsclere
Lymington
Alresford
Odiham
Petersfield
Portsmouth
Ringwood
Romsey
Southampton
Stockbridge
Whitchurch
Winchester

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HantsMap Notes -- DUKNOW1.txt
MN: 1.5.2003
last edit: 21.5.2003