button to main menu; 

Map Notes -- 
brief essays about a map in 
the HMCMS Map Collection   Map Notes


Fothergill 1900s
button 
to 1st map described 

NOTES from FOTHERGILL'S FINGER POST ROAD MAPS, 1900s

  
These notes are taken from the Philips' Finger Post Guides to Road Junctions, part 1 for routes from London to south east England, by Gerald Fothergill, published by George Philip and Son, Fleet Street, London, 1900s. The item studied is in a private collection.
map type: HantsMap & Fothergill 1900s
The map size is: wxh, booklet = 9x16cm. The road book is a hard bound booklet. Detail notes are only made for Hampshire interest.

Cover

The cover is printed red on dull green. There is a road scene; a cyclist is taking the left fork at a junction while an open car, driver and three passengers, the ladies with large hats and motoring veils, takes the right. There is a finger post at the junction. An enlarged finger post carries the series title. The cover reads:-
WATERPROOF CLOTH / PHILIP'S 'FINGER POST' GUIDES to ROAD JUNCTIONS PART 1 12 ROUTES FROM LONDON G. FOTHERGILL / TWO SHILLINGS AND SIXPENCE NET
And there is an example map circle to show the style of content.

Title Page

The title page reads:-
PHILIPS' 'FINGER-POST' GUIDES TO ROAD JUNCTIONS. FOR MOTORISTS AND CYCLISTS. BY GERALD FOTHERGILL. PART I. - TWELVE MAIN ROUTES FROM LONDON.
LONDON: GEORGE PHILIP AND SON, LTD., 32 FLEET STREET. LIVERPOOL: PHILIP, SON & NEPHEW, LTD., 45-51 CASTLE STREET. (All Rights Reserved.)

General Map

Immediately inside the front cover there is a general map of south east England, showing the 12 routes from London; wxh, sheet = 25.5x30cm, wxh, map = 233x282mm.
title    
plain cartouche    

Printed lower right in a plain cartouche is:-
SKETCH MAP of SOUTH EAST ENGLAND Showing the TWELVE ROUTES

scale line    
scale    

Printed in the title cartouche is a scale of:-
Statute Miles
marked 0, 5, 10, 20, 30. The 30 miles = 37.9 mm giving a scale 1 to 1273887. The map scale is about:-
1 to 1300000
20 miles to 1 inch

table of symbols    
Printed in the title cartouche are two symbols descriptions:-
The Routes are shown thus [wide line]
Other Roads thus [thin line]

roads    
The twelve routes are:-
London to Dover
London to Folkestone
London to Hastings
London to Eastbourne
London to Brighton
London to Worthing
London to Portsmouth
London to Southampton
London to Bristol
London to Oxford
London to Cromer
London to Ipswich


Introduction

An introduction to the maps is:-
INTRODUCTION
The great revival in the use of our highways by motorists and cyclists has called for some improved method of finding ones route from place to place, as even with the help of good maps and road books a necessary turning is frequently passed before one can realise it. Especially is this so in towns, as instance the Worthing Road right angle turns at Merton, Leatherhead and Dorking; a stranger at those places would most certainly take the straight road instead of a right angle.
It has been often said that 'history repeats itself;' this is even true of such modern means of locomotion as the motor car and the bicycle, for with the introduction of fast carriages and mail coaches came the demand for a series of road books - the first being by John Ogilby and published in 1475. In 1741 appeared the 'Traveller's Pocket Companion;' this gives 'directions what turning are to be avoided in going and returnings on journeys.' Other famous guides are those of Patterson in 1771 and Cary in 1798.
Existing road books have chiefly contained a list of places on any given route with mileage. A fairly long experience of touring has shown that finger posts are placed so close to the junction that the divergent post is passed before it can be read, or, at any rate, one can use the information afforded. Other finger posts are of little use as they are only painted on one side or are out of repair.
The following system was invented to enable the traveller to know beforehand the information contained on the sign post and the correct turnings to take. In fact it was thought of in coasting down a hill after a long toil up when a fork turning suddenly appeared, together with the usual direction post, but this not being read in time the left hand road was taken, the very dread of having to walk back up the hill gave the idea that one ought to know the correct turning in time to steer into the right road. It was at once seen that a series of diagrams of road junctions would enable the tourist to know how to avoid the next difficult point directly he had left the previous one, and that by leaving out the many straight pieces of road without junctions and therefore of no interest to the traveller, a far larger scale could be given to the important junctions; also, by having the diagrams disjointed that difficulty of road maps when roads take a right angle and reach the edge of the paper does not occur, for under this system the next diagram always starts longitudinally.
In most cases it has been found practicable to give some indication of this approach of a turning by means of showing some adjacent object, such as an inn, bridge, river, tower, spire or church, but in all cases the mileage between diagrams is given, and this will act as a guide to the position of the difficult junctions.
Where the route terminates, a black line is inserted, dividing the diagrams on the outward from those of the homeward journey.
Beware the errors in the historical facts given in this introduction.

Contents

There follows a contents page listing the routes.

CONTENTS.

           
No. of Route. TITLE.       Page.
           
... ... ...   ...   ...
VII. London to Portsmouth & Southsea ...   Key Map   134
  London to Portsmouth & Southsea ...   Maps 247-268    
VIIA. Southsea & Portsmouth to London   Maps 269-286    
VIII. London to Southampton   Key Map   156-7
  London to Southampton   Maps 287-310    
VIIIA. Southampton to London   Maps 311-331    
... ... ...   ...   ...

Index

The book has an index of place names at the back.

CIRCLE MAP FEATURES

table of symbols    
There is a page for:-
EXPLANATION OF THE DIAGRAMS.
(NOTE. - The compiler has left out the many straight pieces of road without junctions that present little difficulty to the traveller, and the names of the places thus passed through will be found printed between the diagrams.)
The diagrams are drawn on a scale of 2 inches to a mile.
The points on the road between which the distances are reckoned are indicated thus [circle+arrow] e.g. - the distance between the arrow in Diagram No.1 to the arrow in Diagram No.2 is 3 3/4 miles, as stated at the top of the first circle.
[shading] Buildings in towns and villages
[square block] Churches with tower
[round block] [do.] [do.] spire
[cross (+)] [do.] without tower or spire
[chequered line and bridge over double line] Railway over the road
[double line and bridge over a chequered line] [do.] under [do.] [do.]
M.S. Milestone with mileage
.97 Height above sea level
[north point] North Point
A thick rule [wide bold line] across page denotes the end of a route

table of symbols    
Each key map, showing the overall route, has its own table of symbols. For example the London to Portsmouth route, page 134 has:-
The Route [wide bold line]
[shaded circle] Sections on Outward and Homeward Journeys
[circle] Outward Journeys only
[dotted circle] Homeward [do.] [do.]
[narrow line] Other Roads
The figures in brackets give the numbers of the Sections
The figures between the towns and villages give the mileage
For some reason the circles, diagrams, are now referred to as 'sections'.

The circle maps are arranged two to each page, numbered in sequence. Pages are also numbered. The circle features have been described for another map in this series:-
button notes: FOTHER1.txt
The circles of Hampshire interest are:-

VII London to Portsmouth and Southsea


VIIA Southsea and Portsmouth to London

         
page circle place
         
134   key map
         
140 257 Godalming   Surrey
  258 Milford    
141 259 Red Lion, near Thursley    
  260 Royal Huts Inn, Hindhead Common    
142 261 Liphook   Hampshire
  262 Rake   West Sussex
143 263 Sheet, Petersfield    
  264 Petersfield    
144 265 Horndean    
  266 Cosham, Portsmouth    
145 267 Portsmouth    
  268 Southsea, Portsmouth    
         
         
146 269 Southsea, Portsmouth   Hampshire
  270 Portsmouth    
147 271 Cosham, Portsmouth    
  272 Horndean    
148 273 Petersfield    
  274 Sheet, Petersfield    
149 275 Liphook    
  276 Milford   Surrey
150 277 Godalming    

VIIL London to Southampton


VIIIA Southampton to London

         
page circle place
         
156-157   key map
         
162 296 Bagshot   Surrey
163 297 Jolly Farmers Inn    
  298 Frimley   Surrey
    Blackwater   Hampshire
164 299 Aldershot, Rushmoor    
  300 Farnham   Surrey
165 301 Alton   Hampshire
  302 Chawton    
166 303 across R. Alre    
  304 Itchen Abbass    
167 305 Kings Worthy    
  306 Winchester    
168 307 Otterbourne    
  308 Bassett, Southampton    
169 309 Southampton    
  310 Southampton    
         
         
170 311 Southampton   Hampshire
  312 Southampton    
171 313 Bassett, Southampton    
  314 Chandler's Ford, Eastleigh    
172 315 Winchester    
  316 Kings Worthy    
173 317 Itchen Abbass    
  318 cross R. Alre    
174 319 Ropley Dean, Ropley    
  320 Chawton    
175 321 Alton    
  322 Farnham   Surrey
176 323 Farnborough, Rushmoor   Hampshire
  324 Blackwater   Hampshire
    Frimley   Surrey
177 325 Bagshot    

button map type Fothergill 1900s -- menu of resources
button source item -- private collection (21) -- road map

button list of map notes

HantsMap Notes -- FOTHER2.txt
MN: 30.11.2002
last edit: 30.11.2002