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placename:- Derwent Water
parish Keswick parish, once in Cumberland
county:- Cumbria
parish Above Derwent parish, once in Cumberland
parish Borrowdale parish, once in Cumberland
lake
coordinates:- NY260210
10Km square:- NY22
county:- Cumbria
parish Borrowdale parish, once in Cumberland
lake
10Km square:- NY21

1Km square NY2621

1Km square NY21

photograph

Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- 12.4.2010
photograph

Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- From Lowcrag Wood by Ashness Bridge. -- 3.4.2006

old map:- Dunlop 1950s

Drawn by J R Hart.
thumbnail DP01E2, button to large image

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1950
period:- 1950s

source:- Burrow 1920s

Road strip maps with parts in Westmorland, Cumberland etc, now Cumbria, irregular scale about 1.5 miles to 1 inch, by E J Burrow and Co, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, 1920s.
... Keswick, where lovely Derwentwater is close at hand on the left. This is one of the broader lakes and its wooded shores and pretty islands give it a distinctive beauty of its own. ...

date:- 1920=1929
period:- 1920s

text:- Mason 1907 (edn 1930)

Page 21:-
...
Beautiful Derwent Water! - the fairest of all the lakes, many people think - with its green shores and
Page 22:-
fringing trees, its islets and its mountain background; but perhaps Ullswater, on the other side of Helvellyn, has a wilder beauty.
date:- 1907
period:- 1900s

source:- OS County Series (Cmd 64)

County Series maps of Great Britain, scales 6 and 25 inches to 1 mile, published by the Ordnance Survey, Southampton, Hampshire, from about 1863 to 1948.
Lowest point of bed of lake 172 feet above O.S. datum
elsewhere:-
Sur. of Water 238.3
coordinates:- NY265207
date:- 1867=1868
period:- 19th century, late; 1860s

old map:- Mill and Heawood 1895

Series of maps of the English Lakes, with soundings by Hugh Robert Mill and Edward Heawood, by Bartholomew, Edinburgh, Scotland, published by George Philip and Son, 32 Fleet Street, London, etc, 1895.
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placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1895
period:- 19th century, late; 1890s

old map:- Jenkinson 1875 map1

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date:- 1875
period:- 19th century, late; 1870s

source:- Martineau 1855

Guide book, A Complete Guide to the English Lakes, by Harriet Martineau, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Whittaker and Co, London, 1855; published 1855-71.
Plate, opposite p.74:-
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Print, engraving, Derwent Water from Castle Head, drawn by L Aspland, engraved by W Banks, Edinburgh, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Whittaker and Co, London, 1855.
L Aspland Delt. / W Banks Sc Edinr. / DERWENT WATER / from Castle Head
person:- artist : Aspland, T L
person:- engraver : Banks, W
person:- publisher : Garnett, John
date:- 1855
period:- 19th century, late; 1850s

source:- Martineau 1855

Guide book, A Complete Guide to the English Lakes, by Harriet Martineau, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Whittaker and Co, London, 1855; published 1855-71.
Page 74:-
EXCURSIONS FROM KESWICK.
DERWENT WATER.
The first object of attention will be the lake itself; and it will probably be viewed by boat. The uppermost thought at all points about the foot of the lake is of the Derwentwater family. They had once a castle on the hill called Castlehead, where they built upon the site of a Druidical circle. This hill should be visited for the view. The Ratcliffes also possessed Lord's Island, the largest on the lake, ... Ramps Holme, another of the islands, was their's also; and the hermit, the dear friend of St. Cuthbert, who lived in St. Herbert's Isle in the seventh century, is somehow mixed up in legends, in local imaginations which are careless of dates, with the same family. ... Vicar's, or
Page 75:-
Derwent Isle, is the other of the four larger islands. Lord's Isle was once a part of the mainland. The Ratcliffes cut a fosse, in the feudal times, and set up a drawbridge. ...
The lake is about three miles long, and, at its broadest part, about a mile and a half wide. Its waters are singularly clear, and its surface often unruffled as a mirror. Then it reflects the surrounding shores with marvellous beauty of effect,- from the bare crest of the crag and peak of the mountain to the grassy knoll and overhanging birch. Pike, trout, and perch abound in the lake; but not char, which requires deeper water. The Floating Island, whose appearance is announced in the newspapers at intervals of a few years, has obtained more celebrity than it deserves. ...
person:- : Derwentwater Family; Radcliffe Family
date:- 1855
period:- 19th century, late; 1850s

source:- Martineau 1855

Guide book, A Complete Guide to the English Lakes, by Harriet Martineau, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Whittaker and Co, London, 1855; published 1855-71.
Page 180:-
A TABLE OF THE LENGTH, BREADTH, AND DEPTH OF THE LAKES.
No. : Names of Lakes. : Counties : Length in Miles. : Extreme breadth in Miles : Extreme depth in Feet : Height above the Sea
11 : Derwentwater : Cumberland : 3 : 1½ : 72 : 228

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1855
period:- 19th century, late; 1850s

source:- Martineau 1855

Guide book, A Complete Guide to the English Lakes, by Harriet Martineau, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Whittaker and Co, London, 1855; published 1855-71.
Plate, opposite p.74:-
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Print, engraving, Derwent Water from Castle Head, drawn by L Aspland, engraved by W Banks, Edinburgh, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Whittaker and Co, London, 1855.
L Aspland Delt. / W Banks Sc Edinr. / DERWENT WATER / from Castle Head
person:- artist : Aspland, T L
person:- engraver : Banks, W
person:- publisher : Garnett, John
date:- 1855
period:- 19th century, late; 1850s

source:- Martineau 1855

Guide book, A Complete Guide to the English Lakes, by Harriet Martineau, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Whittaker and Co, London, 1855; published 1855-71.
Page 74:-
EXCURSIONS FROM KESWICK.
DERWENT WATER.
The first object of attention will be the lake itself; and it will probably be viewed by boat. The uppermost thought at all points about the foot of the lake is of the Derwentwater family. They had once a castle on the hill called Castlehead, where they built upon the site of a Druidical circle. This hill should be visited for the view. The Ratcliffes also possessed Lord's Island, the largest on the lake, ... Ramps Holme, another of the islands, was their's also; and the hermit, the dear friend of St. Cuthbert, who lived in St. Herbert's Isle in the seventh century, is somehow mixed up in legends, in local imaginations which are careless of dates, with the same family. ... Vicar's, or
Page 75:-
Derwent Isle, is the other of the four larger islands. Lord's Isle was once a part of the mainland. The Ratcliffes cut a fosse, in the feudal times, and set up a drawbridge. ...
The lake is about three miles long, and, at its broadest part, about a mile and a half wide. Its waters are singularly clear, and its surface often unruffled as a mirror. Then it reflects the surrounding shores with marvellous beauty of effect,- from the bare crest of the crag and peak of the mountain to the grassy knoll and overhanging birch. Pike, trout, and perch abound in the lake; but not char, which requires deeper water. The Floating Island, whose appearance is announced in the newspapers at intervals of a few years, has obtained more celebrity than it deserves. ...
person:- : Derwentwater Family; Radcliffe Family
date:- 1855
period:- 19th century, late; 1850s

source:- Martineau 1855

Guide book, A Complete Guide to the English Lakes, by Harriet Martineau, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Whittaker and Co, London, 1855; published 1855-71.
Page 180:-
A TABLE OF THE LENGTH, BREADTH, AND DEPTH OF THE LAKES.
No. : Names of Lakes. : Counties : Length in Miles. : Extreme breadth in Miles : Extreme depth in Feet : Height above the Sea
11 : Derwentwater : Cumberland : 3 : 1½ : 72 : 228

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1855
period:- 19th century, late; 1850s

old map:- Garnett 1850s-60s H

Map of the English Lakes, scale about 3.5 miles to 1 inch, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, 1850s-60s.
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DERWENT WR.
outline with shore form lines, lake or tarn
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placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1850=1869
period:- 19th century, late; 1850s; 1860s

old map:- Ford 1839 map

Map of the Lake District, published in A Description of Scenery in the Lake District, by William Ford, published by Charles Thurnham, London, 1839.
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DERWENT WATER AND VALE OF KESWICK

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1839
period:- 19th century, early; 1830s

old map:- Ford 1839 map

Map of the Lake District, published in A Description of Scenery in the Lake District, by William Ford, published by Charles Thurnham, London, 1839.
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Derwent Water
Outline with form lines.

placename:- Derwent Water
county:- Westmoreland
date:- 1839
period:- 19th century, early; 1830s

descriptive text:- Ford 1839 (3rd edn 1843)

Description of Scenery in the Lake District, by William Ford, published by Charles Thurnham, London, et al, 1839; published 1839-52.
plate:-
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Page 53:-
...
We shall now hasten to describe the lake, which is the chief object of attraction, ...
DERWENT WATER
Is of an oval shape, three miles long, and one mile and a half broad. Its waters abound with trout, pike, perch, and eels; and are separated from Bassenthwaite by low, flat, marshy, meadow lands. This lake is surrounded by magnificence. On the south, rise the fantastic mountains of Borrowdale; to the north, the solitary majesty of Skiddaw uprears his lordly head; on the east, the steeps of Wallow Crag, Lowdore, and the Gowdar Crag; and on the west, Cat Bells and the clustering mountains of Newlands. It has been said to partake of the majesty of Ulles Water, and the lovely scenery of Windermere. The near views of this lake are from Crow Park, Friar's Crag, Stable Field, and the Vicarage; the more distant are from Latrigg, Ormathwaite, Applethwaite, and along the foot of Skiddaw towards Bassenthwaite. Good bird's-eye views are presented from Castle Hill, Ashness, and Lowdore.
The islands rather take from, than add to the attractions of the water. Their uniform roundness and thickness of foliage, with the manner of
Page 54:-
their disposition, when viewed with any of the grander features about the lake, are deformities. ...
In riding round the lake, numberless are the views of beauty, magnificence, and sublimity, which will strike the traveller of taste and discernment. Leaving Keswick and proceeding southwards along the eastern side, you have the grandest side-screens
Page 55:-
and foregrounds in Wallow Crag and the several precipices in that range, which sometimes come magnificently forward, sometimes retire and lean to the east, their grey fronts often enlivened by green woods, and combining with the water - the small meadowy promontories and tree-clad eminences - with Glaramara and his azure compeers in Borrowdale. The first we shall particularise is one of the lake, as seen over Lord's Island, Castle Head being on the left and Friar Crag on the right of that island, and beyond, Causey Pike with Newlands lying between Grizedale and Cat Bells. ... Gowdar
Page 56:-
Crag upon the left, broad, bold, and finely marked, rearing its aged head to an enormous height, overlooks the embattled projection of Shepherd's Crag on the right. These rocks, exhibiting surfaces of grandeur, are finely contrasted and beautifully enriched with oak, ash, and birch, of which some are large and stately, others picturesque and wild, fantastically expanding over, and impending from, and partially obscuring rocks where vegetation could scarcely be expected. ... Along the western side of the lake are two terrace-roads, the lower one of which is commonly used, and commands a succession of scenes replete with gratification. The retrospective views are into Borrowdale, but in front are the islands studding the glassy mirror of the lake, the finely-embayed coast about Water End and Brandelow, with the deeply-indented shores of the rich country beyond, and the town of Keswick overlooked by Lonscale Fell, Skiddaw, and Blencathra. Passing by Derwent Bank and Lodge with Foe Park, you come to Portinscale, a small village on the gentle swell of a hill, which rises from the lake and river. From
Page 57:-
the neighbouring grounds that are higher than the houses, may be viewed the lakes of Derwent Water and the Bassenthwaite, with all the finely-wooded and fertile country reaching from Swineside to Skiddaw, a scene which for extent, beauty, and sublimity, can rarely be equalled. Hence you cross the Long Bridge over the Derwent, and passing the church by the high-road or through the meadows of Howray, arrive again at Keswick.
The boating on the lake presents the same grand objects from a different surface and point of view. ... We should, therefore, recommend the excursion to be left to the discretion of the boatmen, who are also guides. If it could be made by moonlight, the gratification would be intense.
Page 177:-
A TABLE
OF THE LENGTH, BREADTH, &c. OF THE LAKES,
COLLECTED FROM DIFFERENT AUTHORITIES.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1839
period:- 19th century, early; 1830s

old print:- Rose 1832-35

Engravings - Westmorland, Cumberland, Durham and Northumberland Illustrated; from drawings by Thomas Allom, George Pickering, and H Gastineau, described by Thomas Rose, published by H Fisher, R Fisher, and P Jackson, Newgate Street, London, 1832-35.
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Derwentwater and the Village of Grange, from the Entrance to Borrowdale
Drawn by Thomas Allom, engraved by W le Petit, 1833.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1833
period:- 19th century, early; 1830s

old map:- Leigh 1830 map

Map, A New Map of the Lakes, scale 4 miles to 1 inch, and separate detail maps of various lakes, issued with Leigh's Guide to the Lakes and Mountains of Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire, by M A Leigh, published by Leigh and Son, 421 Strand, London, 1830-40.
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date:- 1830
period:- 19th century, early; 1830s

old print:- Otley 1823 (8th edn 1849)

Guidebook, Concise Description of the English Lakes, later A Description of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, published by the author, Keswick, Cumberland, by J Richardson, London, and by Arthur Foster, Kirky Lonsdale, Cumbria, 1823 onwards.
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Engraving, outline view of mountains, Derwent Water from Crow Park, drawn by T Binns, engraved by O Jewitt, opposite p.10 of A Descriptive Guide of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, 8th edition, 1849.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1849
period:- 19th century, early; 1840s

descriptive text:- Otley 1823 (5th edn 1834)

Guidebook, Concise Description of the English Lakes, later A Description of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, published by the author, Keswick, Cumberland, by J Richardson, London, and by Arthur Foster, Kirky Lonsdale, Cumbria, 1823 onwards.
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Page 17:-
DERWENT LAKE,
Near Keswick, is of the most agreeable proportions. In breadth it exceeds any of the neighbouring lakes, being nearly a mile and a half; although its whole length is little more than three miles. Lakes of greater length generally extend too far from that mountain scenery, which is so conducive to their importance; but Derwent Lake appears entirely encircled; and visiters (sic) are at a loss which to admire most, the broken rocky mountains of Borrowdale on the one hand, or the smooth flowing lines of Newlands on the other; while the majestic Skiddaw closes up the view to the north.
The islands are of a more proportionate size, and disposed at better distances, than those in any of the neighbouring lakes. The largest, called Lord's Isle, ... This, and the smaller island called Rampsholm, form part of the late Earl of Derwentwater's sequestrated estate, ...
The Vicar's Isle, ...
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Page 18:-
... For some years it was called Pocklington's Island, ... and is sometimes by way of pre-eminence called Derwent Isle.
One, nearer the middle of the lake, is called St. Herbert's Isle, ...
There are other small islets; as, Otter Isle, situated in a bay near the head of the lake, the views from which have been much admired; a piece of rock called Tripetholm, and two others known by the name of Lingholms.
Besides these permanent islands, an occasional one is sometimes observed, called the Floating Island: ...
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Page 19:-
...
Another peculiarity has been attributed to this lake in what is called the Bottom Wind: which has been described as an agitation of the water occurring when no wind can be felt on any part of the lake. It has been supposed to originate at the bottom of the water; and some, associating this with the last mentioned phenomenon, have ascribed both to those subterranean convulsions by which earthquakes are produced. Although it be admitted, that the waves are sometimes greater than could be reasonably expected, from any wind perceivable at the time; yet, it may be doubted whether they are ever formed when no wind is stirring: and if such a term as 'Bottom wind' must still be retained, I think it ought to be referred to the bottom of the atmosphere, rather than the bottom of the lake.
The depth of Derwent Lake does not in any part exceed fourteen fathoms: a great portion of it scarcely one fourth of that measure. It is supplied chiefly from Borrowdale, and forms a reservoir for the water, which in heavy rains pours down the steep mountains on every side; by which means its surface is often raised six or seven feet; and in an extraordinary case has been known to rise a perpendicular height of eight feet, above its lowest water
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Page 20:-
mark. At such times the meadows are overflowed, all the way between this lake and Bassenthwaite. Its surface being large in proportion to its depth, causes it to be sooner cooled down to the freezing point; and it frequently affords a fine field for the skaiter (sic). In January 1814, the ice attained the thickness of ten inches.
The fish of this lake are trout, pike, perch, and eels. The trout, which are very good, are taken by angling, in the months of April and May; the pike and perch during the whole summer.
It would be superfluous to enter into a description or enumeration of the different views on this lake: many attempts have been made to describe them - but they must be seen to be duly appreciated.
Parties navigating the lake may be landed upon the different islands, and also to view the cascades at Barrow and Lowdore: at the latter place is a public-house where a cannon is kept for the echo, which on a favourable opportunity is very fine; the sound being reverberated from the rocks, encompassing the valley, at intervals proportioned to their respective distances. ...
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Page 42:-
Winding round Shepherd's Crag towards the top of the fall [Lowdore Cascade], and looking between two finely wooded side screens, through the chasm in which the water is precipitated, a part of Derwent lake with its islands, beyond it the vale of Keswick, ornamented with white buildings, and the whole surmounted by the lofty Skiddaw - forms a picture in its kind scarcely to be equalled.
...
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Page 122:-
ROUND DERWENT LAKE.
A delightful excursion may be made round Derwent lake, either on horseback or in a carriage. The road lies at the foot of the wooded park of Derwentwater, with the lake on the right, and the lofty rocks of Wallow Crag and Falcon Crag on the left; and in many places it commands excellent views. One, much admired, is on emerging from the woods to the more open common, where the road lies just above the margin of the lake. Two miles from Keswick, a road on the left leads to Watendleth, and we pass Barrow House, the beautiful summer residence of Joseph Pocklington, Esq. A fine cascade behind the house may be seen by strangers on application at the lodge. Another mile brings us to Lowdore,- famous for its waterfall. Here is a neat public-house, where a cannon is kept for the echo which is very fine, especially in a still evening. Rather more than four miles from Keswick, we have the hamlet called the Grange, upon the opposite bank of the river.
About Lowdore and Grange, the draftsman will find employment for his pencil; and the geologist
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Page 123:-
will observe the transition, from the blackish clay slate upon which he treads, to the more variously aggregated and paler-coloured rocks on his left hand and before him.
The bridge at Grange might be crossed, as the shortest route; but it may be recommended to proceed forwards another mile to the Bowder Stone - a fragment of rock above twenty yards in length, and half as much in height,- remarkable for being curiously poised upon one of its angles, with a little more support towards one end. But it is not merely for the sight of this stone, that travellers are advised to advance so far. It is chiefly for the prospect here obtained into the interior of Borrowdale, which expands itself as far as Rosthwaite; beyond which the vale is divided into two parts; the one branching off towards Grasmere and Langdale, the other towards Wasdale and Buttermere.
Returning to Grange, the road then crosses the river, and is carried along a pleasant elevation above the woods of Lady William Gordon, the house, formerly called Water End, now Derwentwater Bay, standing sweetly sheltered on the margin of the lake. From this elevation, the lake, with its islands, bays, and promontories, is seen to great advantage. The road then crossing the pleasant vale of Newlands, joins the Cockermouth road at Portinscale, and reaches Keswick in a circuit of 12 miles.

placename:- Derwent Lake
date:- 1823
period:- 19th century, early; 1820s

source:- Otley 1818

New Map of the District of the Lakes, in Westmorland, Cumberland, and Lancashire, scale about 4 miles to 1 inch, by Jonathan Otley, engraved by J and G Menzies, Edinburgh, Lothian, Scotland, published by J Otley, Keswick, Cumberland now Cumbria, 1818; pblished 1818 to 1850s.
image OT02NY22, button   goto source.
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placename:- Derwent
lake

poem:- Syntax 1812

Plate 16
DOCTOR SYNTAX SKETCHING THE LAKE.
relevant text:-
...
The town of Keswick reach'd at last,
Where he his famous work prepar'd,
Of all his toil the hop'd reward.
Soon as the morn began to break,
Old Grizzle bore him to the lake,
Along its banks he gravely pac'd
And all its various beauties trac'd;
When, lo, a threatening storm appear'd
Phoebus the scene no longer cheer'd:
The dark clouds sink on ev'ry hill;
The floating mists the valleys fill:
Nature, transform'd, began to lour,
And threaten'd a tremendous show'r.
'I love,' he cry'd, 'to hear the rattle
'When elements contend to battle;
'For I insist, tho' some may flout it,
'Who write about it and about it,
'That we the picturesque may find
'In thunder loud, or whistling wind;
'And often, as I fully ween,
'It may be heard as well as seen;
'For, tho' a pencil cannot trace
'A sound as it can paint a place,
'The pen, in its poetic rage,
'Can make it figure on the page.'
person:- : Syntax, Dr
date:- 1812
period:- 19th century, early; 1810s

old map:- Housman 1800 map 3

Plan of Lancaster, scale about 5.5 inches to 1 mile, engraved by McIntyre, published by F Jollie, Carlisle, Cumberland, 1800.
thumbnail HM01Der, button to large image
DERWENTWATER

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1800
period:- 19th century, early; 1800s

old text:- Camden 1789

Britannia, or A Chorographical Description of the Flourishing Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by William Camden, 1586, translated from the 1607 Latin edition by Richard Gough, published London, 1789.
Page 170:-
...
... The Derwent running among these hills [Derwent Fells] spreads itself in a spacious lake, or as Bede calls it a very large pool, in which are three islands: one of them has the seat of the knightly family of Ratcliffe, another was inhabited by German miners, and the third is supposed to have been that in which Bede relates that St. Herbert led a solitary life. On the edges of this lake in very rich
person:- : Bede
date:- 1789
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old text:- Camden 1789 (Gough Additions)

Britannia, or A Chorographical Description of the Flourishing Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by William Camden, 1586, translated from the 1607 Latin edition by Richard Gough, published London, 1789.
Page 182:-
...
[at Keswick] ... The form of the lake is irregular, extending about three miles and an half from north to south and about one mile and an half broad; its greatest depth 20 feet. The river Derwent passes through and gives name to it. ...
... Each boundary of the lake partakes of the extremities. The southern varies in rocks of different forms from the tremendous precipices of the Lady's leap and broken front of the Falcon's nest, and the more distant concave curve of Lowdore, a length of precipices intermixed with trees and cataracts. On the north side is a salt spring, once belonging to the monks of Furness, sheep-pastures on the sides of the lofty hills, and woods running down to the water's edge: But most of the antient woods have been cut down by the commissioners for Greenwich hospital. The three islands on this circular lake are finely disposed. The principal is the Lord's island about five acres, where St. Herbert's hermitage was. The late sir Wilfrid Lawson 1761 cut down the old wood and planted new. The water is subject to violent agitation, and, in the calmest weather, the waves will run high and the vessels be tost by what is called a bottom wind. ...
date:- 1789
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

descriptive text:- Farington 1789 (plate 3)

20 engravings, Views of the Lakes in Cumberland and Westmorland, drawn by Joseph Farington, published by William Byrne, London, 1789.
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Print, engraving, View of Skiddaw and Derwentwater, painted by Joseph Farington, engraved by B T Pouncy, published by W Byrne, 79 Titchfield Street, London, 1785.
Taken from the lake margin in Brandlehow Park.
Plate 3 from Views of the Lakes, &c, in Cumberland and Westmorland, published 1789; with descriptive text:-
A VIEW of SKIDDAW and DERWENTWATER.
THIS Plate exhibits a View of the Mountain of Skiddaw, and the Lake of Derwentwater, as seen from Brandelow-Woods on its Western Shore. The Town of Keswick appears on its opposite Side, a little to the Right. ... The Lake of Derwentwater is about three Miles in Length, from North to South; its Breadth about a Mile and a Half. It derives much Beauty from the Islands which are interspersed in it; the principal of these is Lord's Island. about five Acres in Extent, where the unfortunate family of RATCLIFF had once its Residence, taking the Title of Derwentwater from the Lake itself. The Breadth of this Lake bearing so considerable a Proportion to its Length, it nearly retains its Form from whatever Point it is viewed, never assuming the Appearance of a river, which is a Distinction peculiar to itself.
date:- 1785
period:- 18th century, late

descriptive text:- Farington 1789 (plate 1)

20 engravings, Views of the Lakes in Cumberland and Westmorland, drawn by Joseph Farington, published by William Byrne, London, 1789.
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Print, engraving, General View of Derwentwater, painted by Joseph Farington, engraved by W Byrne and T Medland, published by W Byrne, 79 Titchfield Street, London, 1784.
A packhorse on Ashness Bridge in the foreground, Derwent Water with many islands.
Plate 1 from Views of the Lakes, &c, in Cumberland and Westmorland, published 1789; with descriptive text:-
GENERAL VIEW OF DERWENTWATER.
THIS View is intended to convey a general Idea of the Valley of Keswick. Ashness, from whence it is taken, is on the Summit of the Rocks which hang over the Road leading to Lowdore, distant from Keswick about two Miles and a Half. No other Point can perhaps be fixed upon where the several Features which distinguish this romantic Vale will appear to be so strongly marked. The Elevation is sufficient to command an extensive Prospect, without so far reducing its component parts as materially to affect their Importance. A great Part of Derwentwater, including its four principal Islands, is in Front, and the Lake of Bassenthwaite in the Distance. The Stream which forms the Communication between them is only to be traced by the Flatness and Luxuriance of the adjacent Meadows. The Foot of Bassenthwaite is distant about ten Miles from Ashness. From the Margin of this Lake on the Right rises Skiddaw, on whose Skirts appear a part of the Town of Keswick; the rest is concealed from the View by Cockshut-Hill. On the Left of Derwentwater are Newlands and Thornthwaite-Fells. Beyond these are the Woods of Wythop hanging over the more distant Lake. The whole View is terminated by Caer-Mote, a Hill remarkable for still retaining the evident Traces of a Roman Encampment.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1784
period:- 18th century, late

old text:- Gilpin 1786

Gilpin 1786

Guide book, Observations, Relative Chiefly to Picturesque Beauty, Made in the Year 1772, on Several Parts of England, Particularly the Mountains, and Lakes of Cumberland Westmoreland, by Rev William Gilpin, 1772-74; published 1786-1808.
plate opposite vol.1 p.179
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caption from the list of plates:-
This plan of Keswick-lake means only to express the general shape of it; and the relative situation of it's several parts.
vol.1 p.180
The lake of Derwent, or Keswick-lake, as it is generally called, is contained within a circumference of about ten miles; presenting itself in a circular form, tho in fact it is rather oblong. It's area is interspersed with four or five islands; three of which only are of consequence, Lord's island, Vicar's island, and St. Herbert's island: but none of them is comparable to the island on Windermere, in point either of size, or beauty.
If a painter were desirous of studying the circumference of the lake from one station, St. Herbert's island is the spot he should choose; from whence, as from a centre, he might see it in rotation. I have seen a set of drawings taken from this stand; which were hung round a circular room, and intended to give a general idea of the boundaries of the lake. But as no representation could be given of the lake itself; the idea was lost, and the drawings made but an awkward appearance.
Guide book, Observations, Relative Chiefly to Picturesque Beauty, Made in the Year 1772, on Several Parts of England, Particularly the Mountains, and Lakes of Cumberland Westmoreland, by Rev William Gilpin, 1772-74; published 1786-1808.
vol.1 p.181
...
As the boundaries of this lake are more mountainous than those of Windermere; they, of course, afford more romantic scenery. But tho the whole shore, except the spot where we stood, is incircled with mountains; they rarely fall abruptly into the water; which is girt almost round by a margin of meadow - on the western shores especially. On the eastern, the mountains approach nearer the water; and in some parts fall perpendicularly into it. But as we stood viewing the lake from it's northern shores, all these marginal parts were lost; and
vol.1 p.182
the mountains (tho in fact they describe a circle of twenty miles, which is double the circumference of the lake) appeared universally to rise from the water's edge.
Along it's western shores on the right, they rise smooth and uniform; and are therefore rather lumpish. The more removed part of this mountain-line is elegant: but, in some parts, it is disagreeably broken.
On the eastern side, the mountains are both grander, and more picturesque. The line is pleasing; and is filled with that variety of objects, broken-ground,- rocks,- and wood, which being well combined, take from the heaviness of a mountain; and give it an airy lightness.
The front-screen (if we may so call a portion of a circular form,) is more formidable, than either of the sides. But it's line is less elegant, than that of the eastern-screen. ...
vol.1 p.183
Of all the lakes in these romantic regions, the lake we are now examining, seems to be most generally admired. It was once admirably characterized by an ingenious person, &*RECORD_TYPE part record #x002A; who, on his first seeing it, cried out, Here is beauty indeed - Beauty lying in the lap of Horrour! We do not often find a happier illustration. Nothing conveys an idea of beauty more strongly, than the lake; nor of horrour, than the mountains; and the former lying in the lap of the latter, expresses in a strong manner the mode of their combination. The late Dr. Brown, who was a man of taste, and had seen every part of this country, singled out the scenery of this lake for it's peculiar beauty &*RECORD_TYPE part record #x2020;. And unquestionably it is, in many places, both beautiful, and romantic; particularly along it's eastern, and southern shores: but to give it pre-eminence may be paying it perhaps as much too high a compliment; as it would be too
[1.183.&*RECORD_TYPE part record #x002A;] The late Mr. Avilon, organist of St. Nicholas at Newcastle upon Tyne.
[1.183.&*RECORD_TYPE part record #x2020;] In a letter to Lord Lyttelton, quoted above.
vol.1 p.184
rigourous to make any but a few comparative objections
In the first place, it's form, which in appearance is circular, is less interesting, I think, than the winding sweep of Windermere, and some other lakes; which losing themselves in vast reaches, behind some cape or promontory, add to their other beauties, the varieties of distance, and perspective. Some people object to this, as touching rather on the character of the river. But does that injure ir's beauty? And yet I believe there are very few rivers, which form such reaches, as the lake of Windermere.
To the formality of it's shores may be added the formality of it's islands. They are round, regular, and similar spots, as they appear from most points of view; formal in their situation, as well as in their shape; and of little advantage to the scene. The islands of Windermere are in themselves better shaped; more varied; and uniting together, add a beauty, and contrast to the whole.
But among the greatest objections to this lake is the abrupt, and broken line in several of the mountains, which compose it's screens, (especially on the western, and on part of
vol.1 p.185
the southern shore) which is more remarkable, than on any of the other lakes. We have little of the easy sweep of a mountain-line: at least the eye is hurt with too many tops of mountains, which injure the ideas of simplicity, and grandeur. Great care therefore should be taken in selecting views of this lake. If there is a littleness even among the grand ideas of the original, what can we expect from representations on paper, or canvas? I have seen some views of this lake, injudiciously chosen, or taken on too extensive a scale, in which the mountains appear like hay-cocks.- I would be understood however to speak chiefly of the appearance, which the lines of these mountains occasionally make. When we change our point of view, the mountain-line changes also, and may be beautiful in one point, tho it is displeasing in another.
Having thus taken a view of the whole lake together from it's northern point, we proceeded on our rout to Borrodale, skirting the eastern coast along the edge of the water. The grandest side-screen, on the left, hung over us; and we found it as beautifully romantic,
vol.1 p.186
and pleasing to the imagination, when it's rocks, precipices, and woods became a fore-ground; as it appeared from the northern point of the lake, when we examined it in a more removed point of view.
Nor do these rocky shores recommend themselves to us only as fore-grounds. We found them every where the happiest situations for obtaining the most picturesque views of the lake. The inexperienced conductor, shewing you the lake, carries you to some garish stand, where the eye may range far and wide. And such a view indeed is well calculated, as we have just seen, to obtain a general idea of the whole. But he, who is in quest of the picturesque scenes of the lake, must travel along the rough side-screens that adorn it; and catch it's beauties, as they arise in smaller portions - it's little bays, and winding shores - it's deep recesses, and hanging promontories - it's garnished rock, and distant mountains. These are, in general, the picturesque scenes, which it affords.

placename:- Keswick Lake
other name:- Lake of Derwent
date:- 1786
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old map:- West 1784 map

A Map of the Lakes in Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire, now Cumbria, scale about 3.5 miles to 1 inch, engraved by Paas, 53 Holborn, London, included in the Guide to the Lakes by Thomas West, published by William Pennington, Kendal, Westmorland, and in London, from the 3rd edition 1784, to 1821.
DERWENT WATER
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placename:- Derwent Water
lake
county:- Cumberland

old map:- Crosthwaite 1783-94 (Der)

Series of maps, An Accurate Map of the Matchless Lake of Derwent, of the Grand Lake of Windermere, of the Beautiful Lake of Ullswater, of Broadwater or Bassenthwaite Lake, of Coniston Lake, of Buttermere, Crummock and Loweswater Lakes, and Pocklington's Island, by Peter Crosthwaite, Kendal, Cumberland now Cumbria, 1783 to 1794.
An Accurate MAP of the matcheless LAKE of DERWENT, (situate in the most delightful Vale which perhaps ever Human Eye beheld) near KESWICK, CUMBERLAND; ...
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placename:- Lake of Derwent
lake
county:- Cumberland

descriptive text:- West 1778 (11th edn 1821)

West 1778 (11th edn 1821)

Guide book, A Guide to the Lakes, by Thomas West, published by William Pennington, Kendal, Cumbria once Westmorland, and in London, 1778 to 1821.
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Page 86:-
... This small neat town [Keswick] is at present renowned for nothing so much as the lake it stands near, and which is sometimes called, from the town,
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Page 87:-
the lake of KESWICK, but more properly the lake of DERWENT; and I am inclined to think, and hope to make it appear, that the ancient name of KESWICK is the DERWENT-TOWN, or the town of DERWENT-WATER. But first of the lake itself [1].
The whole extent of the lake is about three miles, from north to south; the form is irregular, and its greatest breadth exceeds not a mile and a half. The best method of viewing this enchanting water, is in a boat, and from the banks. Mr. Gray viewed it from the banks only, and Mr. Mason, after trying both, prefers Mr. Gray's choice; and, where the pleasure of rowing and sailing is out of the question, it will, in general, be found the best, on account of the fore-ground, which the boat does not furnish. Every dimension of the lake, however, appears more extended from its bosom, than from its banks. I shall, therefore, point out the favourite stations round the lake, that have often been verified.
[1] Some agreeable lines descriptive of this Lake, by Dr. Dalton, may be seen in the Addenda, Article II.
...
Guide book, A Guide to the Lakes, by Thomas West, published by William Pennington, Kendal, Cumbria once Westmorland, and in London, 1778 to 1821.
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Page 96:-
... The water of all the lakes in these parts is clear; but the Derwent only is pelucid. In it the smallest pebble is seen at a great depth, nearly as in the open air.
...
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Page 113:-
[The transparent] beauty of the lake is only seen in the boat, and it is very surprising. The bottom resembles a mosaic pavement of party-coloured stone. The fragments of spar at the depth of seven yards either shine like diamonds, or glitter in diversity of colour; and such is the purity of the water, that no mud or ooze defiles its bottom. ...
...
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[Mr Pennant's report] '... The water of Derwent-water is subject to violent agitations, and often without any apparent cause, as was the case this day; the weather was calm, yet the waves ran a great height, and the boat was tossed violently, with what is called bottom wind.'
...
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The characteristic of this lake is, that it retains its form viewed from any point, and never assumes the appearance of a river [2].
[2] The following sketch of the appearance of this amphitheatre, in a hard frost, appeared in the Cumberland Pacquet, February 10, 1784.
Derwent lake has been frozen over for several days, and quantities of timber have been drawn across it by horses. The appearance of this celebrated piece of water and the surrounding mountains is described by numbers who have seen it, as the most delightful of any prospect that can be conceived. The four islands have been visited by crowds of people, who agree that the whole scene is at present more awfully grand and enchanting than in the height of summer. The summits and sides of the mountains, at present clad with snow, the icicles hanging from the different cliffs, and the glassy surface of the lake, all these glittering in the sun, fill the eye with such an assemblage of natural magnificence and beauty as beggars all description.'
The following passage may be worth reading here, taken from a description of the curiosities in the Peak of Derbyshire, in the London Magazine, for October, 1778.
'Long has been the contention between gentlemen of Derbyshire and Cumberland, respecting Dovedale and Keswick, each claiming the superiority of natural beauties, and Dr. Brown has been thought by many to carry the dispute in favour of Keswick. I have carefully surveyed both, without being a native of either country; and if I might presume to be any judge of the matter, I should compare Dovedale to the soft and delicate maiden, and Keswick to the bold and sturdy Briton.'
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The fish here are trout, perch, pike, and eel.
...
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Page 190:-
A TABLE OF THE Height of Mountains and Lakes SEEN IN THIS TOUR, ... TAKEN FROM THE LEVEL OF THE SEA. ... by Mr. John Dalton.
Derwent-water ... 76 [yards]

other name:- Lake of Keswick
person:- : Mason, Mr
person:- : Gray, Mr
person:- : Pennant, Thomas
Altitude 228 feet
date:- 1778
period:- 18th century, late; 1770s

old map:- Bowen and Kitchin 1760

New Map of the Counties of Cumberland and Westmoreland, scale about 4 miles to 1 inch, Emanuel Bowen and Thomas Kitchin, published by T Bowles, John Bowles and Son, Robert Sayer, and John Tinney, 1760; published 1760-87.
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outline with form lines
date:- 1760
period:- 18th century, late; 1760s

old map:- Simpson 1746 map (Wmd)

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Outline with form lines.
county:- Cumberland
date:- 1746
period:- 18th century, early; 1740s

descriptive text:- Simpson 1746

The three volumes of maps and descriptive text published as 'The Agreeable Historian, or the Compleat English Traveller ...', by Samuel Simpson, 1746.
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...
The River Derwent, ... runs among the Mountains, call'd Derwent Fells, which having pass'd, it spreads itself into a spacious Lake, three Mile long, call'd by Bede, Praegrande Stragnum, i.e. a vast Pool, in which there are three Islands, one of them inhabited by German Miners; another is suppos'd by Bede to be the Place where St. Herbert lead an Hermit's Life; and the third has of late Years, had the Honour to be the Seat of the famous Family of Radcliffs, ...

other name:- Praegrande Stragnum
date:- 1746
period:- 18th century, early; 1740s

old map:- Stukeley 1723 -- perhaps relevant

Map of roman roads through Britain, scale about 55 miles to 1 inch, derived from the Antonine Itineraries, plotted by William Stukeley, 1723, published London, 1724.
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date:- 1723
period:- 18th century, early; 1720s

old map:- Morden 1695 (Cmd)

Maps, Westmorland, scale about 2.5 miles to 1 inch, and Cumberland, scale about 3 miles to 1 inch, by Robert Morden, 1695.
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Outline with shore shading.
county:- Cumberland
date:- 1695
period:- 17th century, late; 1690s

old map:- Ogilby 1675 (plate 96)

Road book, Britannia, strip road maps, with sections in Westmorland and Cumberland etc, scale about 1 inch to 1 mile, by John Ogilby, London, 1675; and a general map of England and Wales.
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In mile 29, Cumberland.
Drawn as a wide river, narrowing to a river on the left of the road.
date:- 1675
period:- 17th century, late; 1670s

old map:- Jenner 1643

Table of distances and map, Westmerland ie Westmorland, now Cumbria, scale about 16 miles to 1 inch, by Thomas Jenner, London, 1643.
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outline, shaded
date:- 1643
period:- 17th century, early; 1640s

old map:- Drayton 1612/1622

Map, Cumberlande and Westmorlande, by Michael Drayton in part 2 of Polyolbion, probably engraved by William Hole; published by John Marriott, John Grismand, and Thomas Dewe, London, 1622.
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Darwen fl
Lake and perhaps river, naiad.

placename:- Darwen Fl.
date:- 1622
period:- 17th century, early; 1620s

old map:- Speed 1611 (Cmd)

Maps, The Countie Westmorland and Kendale the Cheif Towne, scale about 3.5 miles to 1 inch, and Cumberland and the Ancient Citie Carlile, scale about 4 miles to 1 inch, by John Speed, London, 1611; published 1611-1770.
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outline, shaded, with 3 islands
date:- 1611
period:- 17th century, early; 1610s

old map:- Saxton 1576

Map, Westmorlandiae et Cumberlandiae Comitatus ie Westmorland and Cumberland, scale about 5 miles to 1 inch, by Christopher Saxton, London, engraved by Augustinus Ryther, 1576; published 1579-1645.
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Darwen flu:
Lake and islands.

placename:- Darwen Flu.
county:- Cumberlandia
lake
date:- 1576
period:- 16th century, late; 1570s

old map:- Wyld 1847

Map of the English Lake District, scale about 3 miles to 1 inch, engraved by James Wyld, Charing Cross East, London, in Sylvan's Pictorial Handbook to the English Lakes, published by John Johnstone, Paternoster Row, London, T Johnstone, Edinburgh, etc, 1847.
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Map, uncoloured engraving, Thirlmere, Derwentwater, and Bassenthwaite Lakes, scale about 3.5 miles to 1 inch, by James Wyld, published by John Johnstone, Paternoster Row, London, et al, 1847.
Tipped in opposite p.164 of Sylvan's Pictorial Guide to the English Lakes.
printed at bottom:-
THIRLMERE, DERWENTWATER, / AND BASSENTHWAITE LAKES.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1847
period:- 19th century, early

descriptive text:- Gents Mag 1751

Map of the Black Lead Mines in Cumberland, and area, scale about 2 miles to 1 inch, published in the Gentleman's Magazine, 1751.
Near Keswic is also another lake about two miles broad, and 4 miles long, in which several beautiful islands are interspersed, but not inhabited by German miners, as was asserted by a worthy brother of yours lately defunct [2]. When I saw them they were so many Ortygias, or islands of Calypso, covered with beautiful woods, which were then felling.
[footnote 2] The writer means the Universal, or London Magazine; for both have given descriptions of this country, so void of truth, that they are, as to those parts, felo de se.- ...

date:- 1751
period:- 18th century, late; 1750s

old print:- Jenkinson 1875

Guide book, A Practical Guide to the English Lake District, by Henry Irwin Jenkinson, published by Edward Stanford, 55 Charing Cross, London, 4th edition 1875.
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Print, lithograph, outline view, Panoramic Sketches from Skiddaw, Cumberland, by Edwin A Pettitt, London, published by Edward Stanford, 55 Charing Cross, London, 1875.
... Derwent Water ...
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Print, lithograph, outline view, Panoramic Sketches from Scawfell Pike, Cumberland, by Edwin A Pettitt, London, published by Edward Stanford, 55 Charing Cross, London, 1875.
... Derwent Water ...

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1875
period:- 19th century, late

old print:- Garnett 1850s-60s F

Set of prints, engravings, Views of the English Lakes or Views in the English Lake District, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, 1850s-60s?
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Print, uncoloured engraving, Derwent Water, Westmorland, engraved by William Banks and Son, Edinburgh, probably published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, 1850s-60s?
Found with Views of the English Lakes.
printed at bottom:-
W. Banks & Son, Edinr. / DERWENT WATER.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1850=1869
period:- 19th century, late

old print:- Farington 1816 (plate 19)

Set of prints, 43 engravings, The Lakes of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Cumberland, drawings by Jospeph Farington, with text by Thomas Hartwell Horne, published by T Cadell, and W Davies, Strand, and by J M'Creery, Black Horse Court, Fleet Street, London, 1816.
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Print, uncoloured engraving, View on the Road from Keswick to Borrowdale, drawn by Joseph Farington, engraved by F R Hay, published by T Cadell and W Davies, Strand, London, 1815.
Barrow House? and Lodore Falls, etc etc.
Plate 20 in The Lakes of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Cumberland.
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
Drawn by J. Farington. / Engraved by F. R. Hay. / View on the Road from Keswick to Borrowdale. / London, Published Septr. 15, 1815, by T. Cadell & W. Davies, Strand.
date:- 1815
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Farington 1816 (plate 20)

Set of prints, 43 engravings, The Lakes of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Cumberland, drawings by Jospeph Farington, with text by Thomas Hartwell Horne, published by T Cadell, and W Davies, Strand, and by J M'Creery, Black Horse Court, Fleet Street, London, 1816.
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Print, uncoloured engraving, East Side of Derwentwater looking towards Lowdore Waterfall, Cumberland, drawn by Joseph Farington, engraved by F R Hay, published by T Cadell and W Davies, Strand, London, 1815.
Plate 20 in The Lakes of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Cumberland.
The accompanying text is by Thomas Hartwell Horne:-
EAST SIDE OF DERWENTWATER LOOKING TOWARDS LOWDORE WATERFALL
THE prominent features of this Lake, as described in the view of 'Derwentwater from Brough Top,' are here seen to considerable advantage. The view of Derwentwater on the east side, looking up towards Lowdore Waterfall, is one of the most beautiful in the whole Lake. The most favourable time to ride on this side is about ten o'clock.
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
Drawn by J. Farington. / Engraved by F. R. Hay. / East side of Derwentwater looking towards Lowdore Waterfall. / London, Published Septr. 15, 1815, by T. Cadell & W. Davies, Strand.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1815
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Farington 1816 (plate 17)

Set of prints, 43 engravings, The Lakes of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Cumberland, drawings by Jospeph Farington, with text by Thomas Hartwell Horne, published by T Cadell, and W Davies, Strand, and by J M'Creery, Black Horse Court, Fleet Street, London, 1816.
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Print, uncoloured engraving, Derwentwater from Brough Top, Cumberland, drawn by Joseph Farington, engraved by F R Hay, published by T Cadell and W Davies, Strand, London, 1815.
Plate 17 in The Lakes of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Cumberland.
The accompanying text is by Thomas Hartwell Horne:-
DERWENTWATER FROM BROUGH TOP.
DERWENT-WATER, or KESWICK LAKE, as it is frequently termed from its vicinity to the town of Keswick, is of an irregular form, somewhat approaching to the oval, and about three miles in length, by one and a half in width. By many tourists, this Lake has been supposed to be the finest in the North of England; but for grandeur and sublimity Ulswater is now allowed to claim the pre-eminence. Derwentwater, however, has this decided advantage over the other Lakes, viz. that it immediately appears to be what it is. The dark frowning Skiddaw 'forms its northern boundary, and seems to rise almost immediately from its shore, though it is at its nearest point half a league distant, and the town of Keswick intervenes. One long mountain, along which the road forms a fine terrace, reaches nearly along the whole of its western side: and through the space between this and the next mountain, which in many points of view appears like the lower segment of a prodigious circle, a lovely vale is seen which runs up amomg the hills.' But the pride of Derwentwater is the head, where the mountains of Borrowdale bound the prospect in a manner singularly wild and grand. Our view, which is taken from Brough Top (an eminence on the left of the road to Keswick from Ambleside,) will convey an accurate idea of its general features. 'The whole,' says Mrs. Radcliffe, 'is seen at one glance, expanding within an amphitheatre of mountains, rocky but not vast; broken into many fantastic shapes, peaked, splintered, impending, and sometimes pyramidal, opening by narrow vallies to the view of rocks that rise immediately byeond (sic), and are again overlooked by others. The precipices seldom hang over the water, but are arranged at some distance; and the shores swell with woody eminences, or sink into green pastural margins. Masses of wood also appear among the cliffs feathering them to their summits' (as may be seen in the foreground on the left of our engraving;) 'and a white cottage sometimes peeps from out their skirts, seated on the smooth knoll of a pasture, and looking so exquisitely picturesque, as to seem placed there purposely to adorn it. The Lake in return faithfully reflects the whole picture; and so even and brilliantly pellucid is its surface, that it rather heightens than obscures the colouring.'
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
Drawn by J. Farington. / Engraved by F. R. Hay. / Derwentwater from Brough-top. / London, Published Septr. 15, 1815, by T. Cadell & W. Davies, Strand.

placename:- Derwentwater
other name:- Keswick Lake
date:- 1815
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Middiman 1784-92 (pl.2)

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Print, uncoloured engraving, Keswick Lake, Cumberland, drawn by J Smith, engraved and published by Samuel Middiman, London, 1784.
Plate 2 from the set of prints, Select Views in Great Britain?
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
Drawn by J. Smith. / Engrav'd by S. Middiman. / KESWICK - LAKE. / Published as the Act directs, Jany. 1st. 1784, by S. Middiman, London.

placename:- Keswick Lake
date:- 1784
period:- 18th century, late

old photograph:- Bogg 1898

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Photograph, halftone print, Derwentwater - Winter, Cumberland, by Abrahams, published by Edmund Bogg, 3 Woodhouse Lane, and James Miles, Guildford Street, Leeds, Yorkshire, 1898.
Included on p.157 of Lakeland and Ribblesdale, by Edmund Bogg.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:-
period:- 19th century, late

old print:-
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Print, uncoloured engraving, Scott's Lodore Hotel, Derwentwater, published by J Scott, Lodore Hotel, Cumberland,
Viewed from the lake side. The reverse side has an advertisement for the hotel:-
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Under the Distinguished Patronage OF THEIR ROYAL HIGHNESSES THE PRINCE OF WALES AND PRINCE ARTHUR. / LODORE HOTEL, AT THE HEAD OF DERWENTWATER, KESWICK, IS THE ONLY HOTEL NEAR THE LAKE. / THE above First-Class Establishment was enlarged especially for an Hotel in 1870. It is situate on the Margin of the Lake, and is replete with every modern improvement, containing the Largest Coffee Room in the Lake District, magnificent Ladies' Coffee Room, Private Sitting Rooms, and Sixty Beds; Hot and Cold Baths, and every other accommodation required in a first-class Hotel. It is delightfully situated in its own Pleasure Grounds, which slope down to the margin of the Lake, and the windows command the grandest scenery in the district, embracing the whole of Derwentwater with its majestic mountains. The celebrated Falls of Lodore are in the Private Grounds at the rear of the Hotel. Parties not staying at the Hotel must have permission from the Proprietor to view the Falls and Grounds. / Fishing free, a third of Derwentwater Lake belonging to the Owner of this Hotel. Parties boarded by week or month. An Omnibus meets the Trains at the Keswick Railway Station, and also runs in connection with Rigg's Royal Mail Coaches from Windermere. Boats supplied direct, and Posting in all its branches. / PARTIES TAKEN TO CHURCH ON SUNDAYS FREE OF CHARGE. / J. SCOTT, PROPRIETOR.
printed at bottom:-
Scott's Lodore Hotel, Derwentwater

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1870=1879
period:- 19th century, late

old print:-
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Print, colour halftone, By the Shores of Derwentwater, from a painting by A Heaton Cooper, 1925.
The bathers appear to be nude.
painted at lower right:-
A. HEATON COOPER -
printed at bottom:-
BY THE SHORES OF DERWENTWATER.:

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1925
period:- 1920s

old print:-
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Print, uncoloured engraving, Skiddaw, drawn by J M W Turner, engraved by W Miller, 1800s?
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
J. M. W. Turner R.A. / W. Miller. / SKIDDAW.
date:- 1800=1809
period:- 19th century, early

old print:-
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Print, uncoloured engraving, Derwentwater, Cumberland, drawn by W H J Bool, published 1920s-30s?
On page 215 of Picturesque Europe, The Lake Country.
printed at lower left:-
WHJBoo[l]
printed at bottom:-
Derwentwater.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1920=1939
period:- 1920s

old print:- Pyne 1853

Set of prints, The English Lake District, or Lake Scenery of England, scenes painted by James Barker Pyne, lithographed by W Gauci, published by Thomas Agnew and Sons, Manchester, 1853; published 1853-70.
thumbnail PY21, button to large image
Derwentwater
Drawn by James Barker Pyne, 1848-1853, lithographed by T Picken, 1859.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1848=1853
period:- 19th century, early; 19th century, late; 1840s; 1850s

old print:- Garnett 1850s-60s F

Set of prints, engravings, Views of the English Lakes or Views in the English Lake District, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, 1850s-60s?
thumbnail GAR716, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Derwent Water, looking towards Lodore, Cumberland, engraved by William Banks, Edinburgh, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, 1850s-60s?
Found with Views of the English Lakes.
printed at bottom:-
Engd. by W. Banks, Edinr. / DERWENT WATER / looking towards Lodore.
date:- 1850=1869
period:- 19th century, late

old print:- Harwood 1842

Set of prints, uncoloured engravings bound in a booklet, Harwood's Views of the Lakes, drawn by John and Frederick Harwood, 26 Fenchurch Street, London, about 1842.
thumbnail HRW212, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Derwentwater and Keswick from Skiddaw, Cumberland, engraved and published by John and Frederick Harwood, 26 Fenchurch Street, London, about 1842.
printed at bottom left, centre:-
London, J & F. Harwood. / Derwentwater and Keswick from Skiddaw.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1842
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Fielding 1822 (plate 5)

Set of prints, aquatints, Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire Illustrated, drawn by Theodore Henry Adolphus Fielding, published by Thomas McLean, 10 Frith Street, Soho Square, London, 1822.
thumbnail BNV39, button to large image
Print, coloured aquatint, Skiddaw over Derwent Water, drawn by Theodore Fielding, published by Thomas McLean, 26 Haymarket, and by Howlett and Brimmer, Columbian Press, 10 Frith Street, London, 1822.
Plate 5 in Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire Illustrated ...
date:- 1822
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Housman 1800

thumbnail PR0478, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Derwentwater or Keswick Lake from Ormathwaite, drawn by IW, engraved by R Scott, published by F Jollie, Carlisle, Cumberland, 1800.
Taken from a guide book, A Descriptive Tour, and Guide to the Lakes, Caves and Mountains, by John Housman, 1800, 5th edn 1812.
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
I.W. delint. / R. Scott sculpt. / Derwentwater or Keswick Lake from Ormathwaite

placename:- Derwentwater
other name:- Keswick Lake
date:- 1800
period:- 19th century, early

old print:-
thumbnail BNF23A, button to large image
View of DERWENTWATER, a LAKE, in Cumberland

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1794
period:- 18th century, late; 1790s

illustration:- LNWR 1910

Guide book, The English Lakes, published by the London and North Western Railway, LNWR, about 1910.
thumbnail NW01E7, button to large image
date:- 1910
period:- 1910s

illustration:- OS 1925

Map, OS Tourist Map of The Lake District, Westmorland, Cumberland, Lancashire, now Cumbria, scale 1 inch to 1 mile, published by the Ordnance Survey, Southampton, Hampshire, from 1925.
thumbnail OS22C, button to large image
date:- 1925
period:- 1920s

old print:- Pearson 1900s

thumbnail PS1E59, button to large image
Print, halftone photograph, Derwentwater from Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale, Cumberland, published by C Arthur Pearson, Henrietta Street, London, 1900s.
On p.161 of Pearson's Gossipy Guide to the English Lakes and Neighbouring Districts.
printed at bottom:-
DERWENTWATER FROM ASHNESS BRIDGE. (p.164). / (Skiddaw in the background).

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1900=1909
period:- 1900s

old print:- Pearson 1900s

thumbnail PS1E58, button to large image
Print, halftone photograph, Derwentwater, from the East, Keswick, Cumberland, published by C Arthur Pearson, Henrietta Street, London, 1900s.
On p.159 of Pearson's Gossipy Guide to the English Lakes and Neighbouring Districts.
printed at bottom:-
DERWENTWATER, FROM THE EAST. (p.158). / (The peak to the right is Causey Pike, the to the left Cat Bells).

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1900=1909
period:- 1900s

old map:- Pearson 1900s map (Der)

thumbnail PSN1M5, button to large image
Map, lithograph, Round Derwent Water, Cumberland, published by C Arthur Pearson, Henrietta Street, London, 1900s.
On p.xxxvii of Pearson's Gossipy Guide to the English Lakes and Neighbouring Districts.
printed at bottom:-
By permission of the Controller of H.M. Stationery Office. / ROUND DERWENT WATER.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1900=1909
period:- 1900s

old print:- Matthew 1866

thumbnail MW1E05, button to large image
Print, engraving, outline view, View from Watendlath Road of Derwent Water and Bassenthwaite, Cumberland, published by J Richardson, Highgate, Kendal, Westmorland, 1866.
Tipped in before p.1 of The English Lakes, Peaks and Passes, from Kendal to Keswick, by George King Matthew.
printed at bottom:-
VIEW FROM WATENDLATH ROAD OF / DERWENT WATER AND BASSENTHWAITE.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1866
period:- 19th century, late

old print:- Sylvan 1847

thumbnail SYL148, button to large image
Print, engraving, Derwent Water by Moonlight, near Keswick, Cumberland, published by John Johnstone, Paternoster Row, London, et al, 1847.
On p.196 of Sylvan's Pictorial Guide to the English Lakes.
printed at bottom:-
DERWENT WATER BY MOONLIGHT.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1847
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Sylvan 1847

thumbnail SYL146, button to large image
Print, engraving, Derwent Water, near Keswick, Cumberland, published by John Johnstone, Paternoster Row, London, et al, 1847.
On p.192 of Sylvan's Pictorial Guide to the English Lakes.
printed at bottom:-
DERWENT WATER.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1847
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Tattersall 1836 (version 1869)

thumbnail TAT212, button to large image
Print, hand coloured, Derwentwater and Bassenthwaite Lakes, from the road to Watendlath, Cumberland, drawn by George Tattersall, 1836, engraved by W F Topham, published by T J Allman, 463 Oxford Street, London, 1869.
Included in The Lakes of England, by W F Topham.
printed at bottom:-
DERWENTWATER and BASSENTHWAITE LAKES, / from the road to Watendlath.
printed at bottom:-
Swinside. / Lord's Seat. / Barff. / St. Herbert's I. / Bassenthwaite L. / Ramps I. / Vicar's I. / Lord's I. / Skiddaw Dodd. / Castle Hill. / Keswick. / Skiddaw. / Latrigg. / Falcon Crag.

placename:- Derwentwater Lake
date:- 1836
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Payn 1860s-70s

thumbnail PN0113, button to large image
Print, colour printed, Derwent Water, Keswick, Cumberland, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Simpkin, Marshall and Co, London, 1860s-70s?
Tipped in opposite p.56 of England's Lakeland, a Tour Therein, by James Payn.
printed at bottom:-
DERWENT WATER.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1860=1879
period:- 19th century, late

old print:- Payn 1860s-70s

thumbnail PN0112, button to large image
Print, uncoloured woodcut, Derwent Water, Keswick, Cumberland, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Simpkin, Marshall and Co, London, 1860s-70s?
On p.55 of England's Lakeland, a Tour Therein, by James Payn.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1860=1879
period:- 19th century, late

old print:- Heywood 1906

Guide to Keswick and its Vicinity, in the Penny Guide Books series, published by Abel Heywood and Son, 56-58 Oldham Street, Manchester, and by Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent and Co, Ave Maria Lane, Paternoster Row, London, 1906.
thumbnail HW1E09, button to large image
Print, halftone, Keswick and Derwentwater, Cumberland, from a photograph by A Pettitt, Keswick, published by Abel Heywood and Son, 56-58 Oldham Street, Manchester, and by Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent and Co, Ave Maria Lane, Paternoster Row, London, 1906.
In a Guide to Keswick and its Vicinity in the Penny Guide Books series.
printed at bottom:-
Photo by / KESWICK AND DERWENTWATER. / A. Pettitt, Keswick.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1906
period:- 1900s

old print:- Heywood 1906

Guide to Keswick and its Vicinity, in the Penny Guide Books series, published by Abel Heywood and Son, 56-58 Oldham Street, Manchester, and by Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent and Co, Ave Maria Lane, Paternoster Row, London, 1906.
thumbnail HW1E03, button to large image
Print, halftone, Derwentwater, Keswick, Cumberland, from a photograph by H Bell, Ambleside, published by Abel Heywood and Son, 56-58 Oldham Street, Manchester, and by Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent and Co, Ave Maria Lane, Paternoster Row, London, 1906.
In a Guide to Keswick and its Vicinity in the Penny Guide Books series.
printed at bottom:-
Photo by / DERWENTWATER. / H. Bell, Ambleside
inter neg at lower right:-
[H. BELL]

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1906
period:- 1900s

old print:- Rowbotham 1875

Set of prints, Views in the English Lake District, by T L Rowbotham, published by Marcus Ward and Co, London? 1875?
thumbnail LF1E01, button to large image
Print, chromograph, Derwent Water, Cumberland, by T L Rowbotham, published by Marcus Ward and Co, 67-68 Chandos Street, Covent Garden, London, and Belfast, 1875.
Frontispiece to English Lake Scenery, by W J Loftie.
printed at lower right:-
T L Rowbotham
printed at lower left:-
MARCUS WARD & CO CHROMO
date:- 1875
period:- 19th century, late

old print:- Green 1819

thumbnail GN0120, button to large image
Print, aquatint, Derwent Water from Strands Hagg, Keswick, Cumberland, by William Green, 1819, published by R Lough and Co, Chronicle Office, Finkle Street, Kendal, and others, 1820.
Tipped in opposite vol.2 p.106 of The Tourist's New Guide, by William Green.
printed at bottom right, centre:-
Vol.2, page 106, line 11. / DERWENT WATER from STRANDS HAGG. / Published at Ambleside, Augt. 1. 1819, by Wm. Green.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1819
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Green 1819

thumbnail GN0119, button to large image
Print, aquatint, Derwent Water from Crow Park, Keswick, Cumberland, by William Green, 1819, published by R Lough and Co, Chronicle Office, Finkle Street, Kendal, and others, 1820.
Tipped in opposite vol.2 p.83 of The Tourist's New Guide, by William Green.
printed at bottom right, centre:-
Vol.2, page 83, line 1. / DERWENT WATER from CROW PARK. / Published at Ambleside, Augt. 1. 1819, by Wm. Green.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1819
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Green 1819

thumbnail GN0118, button to large image
Print, aquatint, Derwent Water distance Skiddaw, Cumberland, by William Green, 1819, published by R Lough and Co, Chronicle Office, Finkle Street, Kendal, and others, 1820.
Tipped in opposite vol.2 p.31 of The Tourist's New Guide, by William Green.
printed at bottom right, centre:-
Vol.2, page 31, line 29. / DERWENT WATER distance SKIDDAW. / Published at Ambleside, Augt. 1. 1819, by Wm. Green.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1819
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Green 1819

thumbnail GN0117, button to large image
Print, aquatint, Derwent Water near Barrow Beck, Borrowdale, Cumberland, by William Green, 1819, published by R Lough and Co, Chronicle Office, Finkle Street, Kendal, and others, 1820.
Tipped in opposite vol.2 p.23 of The Tourist's New Guide, by William Green.
printed at bottom right, centre:-
Vol.2, page 23, line 10. / DERWENT WATER near BARROW BECK. / Published at Ambleside, Augt. 1. 1819, by Wm. Green.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1819
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Religious Tract Society 1860s

thumbnail RL01E6, button to large image
Print, engraving, Derwentwater, Cumberland, published by the Religious Tract Society, London, 1860s?
Tipped in opp.p.74 in How To See the English Lakes.
printed at bottom:-
DERWENTWATER.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1860=1869
period:- 19th century, late

old print:- Adams 1852

Guide book, Adams's Pocket Descriptive Guide to the Lake District, by Sir Edward Litt Laman Blanchard, illustrated by F G Delamotte, published by W J Adams, 59 Fleet Street, London, 1852.
thumbnail AD03E4, button to large image
Print, engraving, Keswick Lake and Lowdore Fall, by F G Delamotte, published by W J Adams, 59 Fleet Street, London, 1852.
Tipped in opp.p.59 in Adams's Pocket Descriptive Guide to the Lake District.
printed at lower right:-
F DELAMOTTE
printed at bottom:-
KESWICK LAKE AND LOWDORE FALL.

placename:- Keswick Lake
date:- 1852
period:- 19th century, late

old print:- Nelson 1859

Guide book, in the Nelson's Handbooks for Tourists series, The English Lakes, published by T Nelson and Sons, Paternoster Row, London, 1859.
thumbnail NS0104, button to large image
Print, engraving, Derwentwater from Castle Head, drawn by Keeley Halswelle, Edinburgh, published by T Nelson and Sons, Paternoster Row, London, and Edinburgh and New York, United States, 1859.
Tipped in oppposite p.96 of a guide book, The English Lakes.
printed at bottom:-
DERWENTWATER FROM CASTLE HEAD.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1859
period:- 19th century, late

old map:- Hudson 1842 (4th edn 1853)

Guide book, Complete Guide to the Lakes, edited and published by John Hudson, Kendal, Westmorland, 1842..
thumbnail HUD1M2, button to large image
Map, uncoloured engraving, The Vicinity of Keswick, engraved by W Banks, Edinburgh, published by John Hudson, Kendal, Westmorland, 1853.
Circular map, with a vignette view of Derwent Water below.
Tipped in opp p.68 in A Complete Guide to the Lakes, edited John Hudson.
printed at top:-
THE VICINITY OF KESWICK.
printed at bottom:-
W. Banks, sc. Edinr.
date:- 1853
period:- 19th century, late

old print:-
thumbnail PR0343, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Derwent Water and Skiddaw, Cumberland, engraved by M Jackson, published late 19th century?
On page 241 of The Land We Live In.
printed at lower centre:-
M. JACKSON. SC
printed at bottom:-
6.- DERWENT WATER AND SKIDDAW.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1860=1879
period:- 19th century, late

old print:-
thumbnail PR0327, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Derwentwater, Cumberland, engraved by Butterworth and Heath, published late 19th century?
Frontispiece to The English Lakes.
printed at lower right:-
Butterworth & Heath Sc
printed at bottom:-
DERWENTWATER. / DEEP stillness lies upon this lovely lake, /The air is calm, the forest trees are still; / The river windeth without noise, and here / The fall of fountains comes not, nor the sound / Of the white cataract Lodore: the voice - / The mighty mountain voice - itself is dumb. / B. W. PROCTOR.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1880=1899
period:- 19th century, late

old print:-
thumbnail PR0274, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Derwentwater, Cumberland, published late 19th century?
Derwent Isle and its house in the midground.
printed at bottom:-
DERWENTWATER.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1870=1899
period:- 19th century, late

old print:-
thumbnail PR0273, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Derwentwater, Cumberland, published early 19th century?
printed at top right:-
Page 476
printed at bottom:-
Derwentwater

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1800=1839
period:- 19th century, early

old print:-
thumbnail PR0221, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, A View of Derwentwater, Cumberland, engraved by Lodge, published by Alexander Hogg, The Kings Arms, 16 Paternoster Row, London, about 1794.
It has been suggested that this is from Walpoole's Guide to the Lakes.
printed at top:-
Publish'd as the Act directs, by Alexr. Hogg, at the Kings Arms, No16 Paternoster Row, London.
printed at caption:-
View of DERWENTWATER, a LAKE, in Cumberland.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1794
period:- 18th century, late

old print:-
thumbnail PR0166, button to large image
Print, chromolithograph, Derwent Water, Cumberland, published by T Nelson and Sons, London, 1900s?
From a set of prints, The Scenery of the English Lakes
printed at lower centre:-
T. NELSON & SONS
printed at bottom left:-
DERWENT WATER

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1900=1909
period:- 1900s

old print:- Britain and Bayley 1802-18

thumbnail PR0139, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Derwentwater, Cumberland, drawn by W M Craig, engraved by B Compte, published by Vernor and Hood, Poultry, London, 1801.
Included in the Beauties of England and Wales, by John Britton and Edward W Brayley.
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
Engraved by B. Compte from a Drawing by W. M. Craig. / for the Beauties of England & Wales. / DERWENT-WATER, / Cumberland. / London. Publish'd by Vernor & Hood. Poultry, Octr. 1. 1801.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1801
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Rowbotham 1875

Set of prints, Views in the English Lake District, by T L Rowbotham, published by Marcus Ward and Co, London? 1875?
thumbnail PR0130, button to large image
Print, colour lithograph? Derwent Water, Cumberland, by T L Rowbotham, published by Marcus Ward and Co, London? 1875?
Included in the set of prints, Views in the English Lake District.
date:- 1875
period:- 19th century, late

old print:-
thumbnail PR0438, button to large image
Print, aquatint, Derwent Water, Cumberland, drawn by Becker, published by R Crutterell, Bath, Somerset, 1802.
Derwent Isle and its house in the midground.
A companion print has the publisher as Cruttwell.
printed at bottom left, centre:-
Becker del. / Derwent-Water. / Pub. Jan. 1 1802, by R. Crutterell, Bath.

placename:- Derwent Water
date:- 1802
period:- 19th century, early

old print:-
thumbnail PR0442, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Derwentwater from Lodore, Cumberland, drawn by Powell, engraved by C Pye, early 19th century.
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
Powell delin. / C. Pye sculp. / DERWENTWATER FROM LODORE.

placename:- Derwentwater
date:- 1800=1819
period:- 19th century, early

photographs
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- 29.6.2011
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- From the top of the Crow Park drumlin. -- 24.8.2008
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- Delta formation where the River Derwent enters the lake, consolidated into grassland grazed by sheep, multiple channels, new deposits colonised by trees etc. -- Landing stage near Lowdore. -- 17.2.2007
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- Landing stage near Lowdore. -- 17.2.2007
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- Landing stage at Keswick. -- NY264227 (at) -- 24.8.2008
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- From Blease Fell. -- 26.9.2008
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- From Blease Fell. -- 26.9.2008
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- From Barrow House. -- 4.5.2009
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- 7.4.2011
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- From Castle Crag. -- 6.3.2012

photographs
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- Launch, Annie Mellor. -- 3.5.2011
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- Launch, Annie Mellor. -- 3.5.2011
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- Launch, Annie Mellor. -- 3.5.2011
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- Launch, Princess Margaret Rose. -- 3.5.2011

photographs
tiny photograph, 
button to large Derwent Water -- Keswick and Above Derwent etc -- Cumbria -- Cumbria / -- Watercolour by Samuel Brough. -- Courtesy of the Kirkstone Pass Inn.

Old Cumbria Gazetteer - JandMN: 2008

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©  Martin and Jean Norgate: 2012
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