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placename:- Lodore Falls
site name:- Watendlath Beck
locality:- Lodore
parish Borrowdale parish, once in Cumberland
county:- Cumbria
waterfall
coordinates:- NY264187
10Km square:- NY21

1Km square NY2618

We've never been lucky enough to see it in spate!
photograph

Lodore Falls -- Watendlath Beck -- Lodore -- Borrowdale -- Cumbria / -- Along with other commentators, we found this fall unimpressive. -- 3.4.2006

text:- Mason 1907 (edn 1930)

Page 22:-
...
Southey, another lake poet, less famous than Wordsworth, ...
He tells how the waters come down at Lodore, the waterfall at the head of the lake:-
   "Retreating and beating and meeting and sheeting,
   Delaying and straying and playing and spraying,
   Advancing and prancing and glancing and dancing,
   Recoiling, turmoiling, and toiling and boiling,
   And dashing and flashing and splashing and clashing
   And so, never ending, but always descending.
   Sounds and motions for ever and ever are blending
   All at once and all o'er, with a mighty uproar,
   And this way the water comes down at Lodore."
date:- 1907
period:- 1900s

old print:- Heaton Cooper 1905 (edn 1908)

thumbnail HC0146, button to large image
Print, colour halftone, Lodore and Derwentwater, a summer's morn, Borrowdale, Cumberland, from a watercolour painting by Alfred Heaton Cooper, published by Adam and Charles Black, London, 2nd edn 1908.
Opposite p.136 of The English Lakes, painted by Alfred Heaton Cooper, described by William T Palmer.
printed at tissue opposite the print:-
LODORE AND DERWENTWATER / A summer's morn
printed at signed lower left:-
A HEATON COOPER
date:- 1905
period:- 1900s

source:- Philip/Wilson 1890s

thumbnail PHW1E028, button to large image
FALLS OF LODORE.

placename:- Falls of Lodore
date:- 1895
period:- 19th century, late; 1890s

old print:- Bemrose 1881

thumbnail BEM121, button to large image
Print, uncoloured, Falls of Lodore, Borrowdale, Cumberland, published by Bemrose and Sons, 23 Old Bailey, London and Derby, by A B Moss, Carlisle, Cumberland, and by T Wilson, Kendal, Westmorland, about 1881.
On p.76 of a Handy Guide to the English Lakes and Shap Spa.
printed at bottom:-
FALLS OF LODORE.

placename:- Falls of Lodore
date:- 1881
period:- 19th century, late

old photograph:- Bell 1880s-1940s

thumbnail HB0928, button to large image
Photograph, black and white, Lodore Falls, Borrowdale, Cumberland, by Herbert Bell, photographer, Ambleside, Westmorland, 1890s.
internegative at lower left:-
H. Bell
stamped at reverse:-
HERBERT BELL / Photographer / AMBLESIDE
date:- 1890=1899
period:- 19th century, late

old photograph:- Bell 1880s-1940s

thumbnail HB0484, button to large image
Photograph, black and white, Lodore Falls, in spate, Borrowdale, Cumberland, by Herbert Bell, Ambleside, Westmorland, 1890s.
internegative at lower left:-
H. Bell
internegative at lower left:-
HERBERT BELL / Photographer / AMBLESIDE
date:- 1890=1899
period:- 19th century, late

old photograph:- Bell 1880s-1940s

thumbnail HB0485, button to large image
Photograph, sepia, Lodore Falls, in a dry season, Borrowdale, Cumberland, by Herbert Bell, Ambleside, Westmorland, 1890s.
internegative at lower right:-
HERBERT BELL / Photographer / AMBLESIDE
date:- 1890=1899
period:- 19th century, late

source:- Martineau 1855

Guide book, A Complete Guide to the English Lakes, by Harriet Martineau, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Whittaker and Co, London, 1855; published 1855-71.
Page 81:-
... the traveller begins to listen for the fall of Lodore, ... To visit the fall, the way is through the gay little garden [of the Lodore Hotel], and the orchard, (where the fish-preserves are terrible temptations to waste of time) and over a foot bridge, and up into the wood, where the path leads to the front of the mighty chasm. It is the chasm, with its mass of boulders and its magnificent flanking towers of rock, that makes the impressiveness of the Lodore fall, more than the water. No supply short of a full river or capacious lake could correct the disproportion between the channel and the flood. After the most copious rains, the spectacle is of a multitude of little falls, and nowhere of a sheet or bold shoot of
Page 82:-
water. The noise is prodigious, as the readers of Southey's description are aware: and the accessaries are magnificent. Gowder Crag on the left, and Shepherd's Crag on the right, shine in the sun or frown in gloom like no other rocks about any of the falls of the district; and vegetation flourishes every where, from the pendulous shrubs in the fissures, 200 feet overhead, to the wild flowers underfoot in the wood. On a lustrous summer evening, when the lights are radiant, and the shadows sharp and deep, the scene is incomparable, whatever may be the state of the water. When the stream is fullest, and the wind is favourable, it is said the fall is heard a distance of four miles. ...
date:- 1855
period:- 19th century, late; 1850s

source:- Martineau 1855

Guide book, A Complete Guide to the English Lakes, by Harriet Martineau, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Whittaker and Co, London, 1855; published 1855-71.
Page 180:-
WATERFALLS.
No. : Names and Situations of Falls. : Counties : Feet in Height.
6 : Lodore Cascade, near Keswick : Cumberland : 150

placename:- Lodore Cascade
date:- 1855
period:- 19th century, late; 1850s

old map:- Garnett 1850s-60s H

Map of the English Lakes, scale about 3.5 miles to 1 inch, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, 1850s-60s.
thumbnail GAR2NY21, button to large image
Waterfall
two lines across a stream, waterfall
date:- 1850=1869
period:- 19th century, late; 1850s; 1860s

old map:- Ford 1839 map

Map of the Lake District, published in A Description of Scenery in the Lake District, by William Ford, published by Charles Thurnham, London, 1839.
thumbnail FD02NY21, button to large image
Waterfall
Lines cross stream? at 'Low Dore'.
county:- Cumberland
date:- 1839
period:- 19th century, early; 1830s

descriptive text:- Ford 1839 (3rd edn 1843)

Description of Scenery in the Lake District, by William Ford, published by Charles Thurnham, London, et al, 1839; published 1839-52.
Page 55:-
... the far-famed Lowdore possesses irresistible claims on the notice of the wanderer. This Force, after incessant rains, is with its accompaniments sublime, but unfortunately, perhaps, for those who visit the Lakes, few have the opportunity of seeing it at such a time. The chasm through which the river passes is immense, and in dry seasons the stones or fragments of rock subdivide and obscure its waters. ...
Page 166:-
...
Lowdore Inn.- Close to the inn, in the ravine betwixt Gowdar Crag and Shepherd's Crag, is the fall of Lowdore, so whimsically described by Southey. In dry weather, the water almost disappears amongst the jumbled pile of rocks, over which, when full, it rushes with tremendous impetuosity and force.
Page 179:-
WATERFALLS.

placename:- Lowdore Force
other name:- Lodore Fall
date:- 1839
period:- 19th century, early; 1830s

old print:- Otley 1823 (8th edn 1849)

Guidebook, Concise Description of the English Lakes, later A Description of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, published by the author, Keswick, Cumberland, by J Richardson, London, and by Arthur Foster, Kirky Lonsdale, Cumbria, 1823 onwards.
thumbnail O80E14, button to large image
Engraving, Lowdore, the Waterfalls, Borrowdale, drawn by T Binns, engraved by O Jewitt, on p.32 of A Descriptive Guide of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, 8th edition, 1849.

placename:- Lowdore Waterfalls
date:- 1849
period:- 19th century, early; 1840s

descriptive text:- Otley 1823 (5th edn 1834)

Guidebook, Concise Description of the English Lakes, later A Description of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, published by the author, Keswick, Cumberland, by J Richardson, London, and by Arthur Foster, Kirky Lonsdale, Cumbria, 1823 onwards.
image OT01P037, button   goto source.
Page 37:-
... It is the stream from these tarns [Watendlath Tarn and Blea Tarn] which, after running two miles further along a narrow valley, forms the famed cataract of Lowdore. ...
image OT01P042, button   goto source.
Page 42:-
LOWDORE CASCADE constitutes one of the most magnificent scenes of its kind among the lakes. It is not a perpendicular fall, but a foaming cataract; the water rushing impetuously from a height of 360 feet, and bounding over and among the large blocks of stone with which the channel is filled; so that when the river is full, it is a striking object at three miles distance. To the left, the perpendicular Gowder Crag, near five hundred feet high, towers proudly pre-eminent; while from the fissures of Shepherd's Crag on the right, the oak, ash, birch, holly, and wild rose, hang in wanton luxuriance. From the foot of the fall, where it is usually seen, more than half its height lies beyond the limits of the view, and in dry seasons there is a deficiency of water; yet its splendid accompaniments of wood and rock render it at all times an object deserving the notice of tourists.
Winding round Shepherd's Crag towards the top of the fall, and looking between two finely wooded side screens, through the chasm in which the water is precipitated, a part of Derwent lake with its islands, beyond it the vale of Keswick, ornamented with white buildings, and the whole surmounted by the lofty Skiddaw - forms a picture in its kind scarcely to be equalled.

placename:- Lowdore Cascade
date:- 1823
period:- 19th century, early; 1820s

old print:- Fielding and Walton 1821 (plate 25)

Set of prints, Picturesque Tour of the English Lakes, illustrated with hand coloured aquatints by Theodore Henry Fielding and John Walton, published by R Ackermann, 101 Strand, London, 1821.
thumbnail FW0125, button to large image
Print, coloured aquatint, Lowdore Fall, Borrowdale, Cumberland, drawn by Theodore H A Fielding, published by R Ackermann, 101 Strand, London, 1821.
Tipped in opposite p.169 in A Picturesque Tour of the English Lakes.

placename:- Lowdore Fall
date:- 1821
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Fielding and Walton 1821 (plate 38)

Set of prints, Picturesque Tour of the English Lakes, illustrated with hand coloured aquatints by Theodore Henry Fielding and John Walton, published by R Ackermann, 101 Strand, London, 1821.
thumbnail FW0138, button to large image
Print, coloured aquatint, Skiddaw, from the Head of Lowdore Fall, Borrowdale, Cumberland, drawn by John Walton, published by R Ackermann, 101 Strand, London, 1821.
Tipped in opposite p.248 in A Picturesque Tour of the English Lakes.

placename:- Lowdore Fall
date:- 1821
period:- 19th century, early

old text:- Camden 1789 (Gough Additions)

Britannia, or A Chorographical Description of the Flourishing Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by William Camden, 1586, translated from the 1607 Latin edition by Richard Gough, published London, 1789.
Page 182:-
...
... the more distant concave curve of Lowdore, a length of precipices intermixed with trees and cataracts. ...

date:- 1789
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old text:- Clarke 1787

Guide book, A Survey of the Lakes of Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire, by James Clarke, Penrith, Cumberland, and in London etc, 1787 and 1789; and Plans of the Lakes ... 1793.
Page 81:-
...
The cliffs about Low-Door are well clad with trees, which in Spring and Autumn are gilded by the morning's rays in every variety of green, yellow, and brown. Behind the trees the naked grey rock peeps forth in hoary majesty, and by a thousand gradations and breaks of light and shade, contrasts, in cooler tints, the more ardent glow upon the leaves. Down this stupendous rocks pours the cataract of Low-Door, dashed from cliff to cliff
Page 82:-
in sheets of foam; now it leaves the more perpendicular rock, and forms a chrystal arch; and now it runs almost invisible among pointed, broken projections. During a flood, this, like every other cascade, appears with redoubled magnificence. The stream now almost entirely leaves the rock, and pours down, in one-continued sheet, 200 feet high. Should it accidentally catch the point of some projecting cliff, the water is dashed on all sides with inconceivable violence; the noise and roaring of this impetuous torrent is beyond description, and may be heard at several miles distance.

placename:- Cataract of Low Door
date:- 1787
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old text:- Gilpin 1786

Guide book, Observations, Relative Chiefly to Picturesque Beauty, Made in the Year 1772, on Several Parts of England, Particularly the Mountains, and Lakes of Cumberland Westmoreland, by Rev William Gilpin, 1772-74; published 1786-1808.
vol.1 p.190
...
By this time we had approached the head of the lake; and could now distinguish the full sound of the fall of Lodoar; which had before reached our ears, as the wind suffered, indistinctly in broken notes.
vol.1 p.191
This water-fall is a noble object, both in itself, and as an ornament of the lake. It appears more as an object connected with the lake, as we approach by water. By land, we see it over a promontory of low ground, which, in some degree, hides it's grandeur. At the distance of a mile, it begins to appear with dignity.
But of whatever advantage the fall of Lodoar may be as a piece of distant scenery, it's effect is very noble, when examined on the spot. As a single object, it wants no accompaniments of offskip; which would rather injure, than assist it. They would disturb it's simplicity, and repose. The greatness of it's parts affords scenery enough. Some instruments please in concert: others we wish to hear alone.
The stream falls through a chasm between two towering perpendicular rocks. The intermediate part, broken into large fragments, forms the rough bed of the cascade. Some of these fragments stretching out in shelves, hold a depth of soil sufficient for large trees. Among these broken rocks the stream finds it's way through a fall of at least an hundred feet; and in heavy rains, the water is every way suited to the grandeur of the scene. Rocks and
vol.1 p.192
water in opposition can hardly produce a more animated strife. The ground at the bottom is also very much broken, and over-grown with trees, and thickets;amongst which the water is swallowed up into an abyss; and at length finds it's way, through deep channels, into the lake. We dismounted, and got as near as we could: but were not able to approach so near, as to look into the woody chasm, which receives the fall.

placename:- Lodoar
date:- 1786
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old map:- Crosthwaite 1783-94 (Der)

Series of maps, An Accurate Map of the Matchless Lake of Derwent, of the Grand Lake of Windermere, of the Beautiful Lake of Ullswater, of Broadwater or Bassenthwaite Lake, of Coniston Lake, of Buttermere, Crummock and Loweswater Lakes, and Pocklington's Island, by Peter Crosthwaite, Kendal, Cumberland now Cumbria, 1783 to 1794.
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The great Water fall / R. Stephenson's Esq.
waterfall
person:- : Stephenson, R
date:- 1783=1794
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s; 1790s

descriptive text:- West 1778 (11th edn 1821)

Guide book, A Guide to the Lakes, by Thomas West, published by William Pennington, Kendal, Cumbria once Westmorland, and in London, 1778 to 1821.
image WS21P092, button   goto source.
Page 92:-
... Here Gowdar-crag presents itself in all its terrible majesty of rock, ... Above this is seen a towering grey rock, rising ma-
image WS21P093, button   goto source.
Page 93:-
[ma]jestically rude, and near it, Shuttenoer, a spiral rock not less in height, hanging more forward over its base. Betwixt these, an awful chasm is formed, through which the waters of Watanlath are hurled. This is the Niagara of the lake, the renowned cataract of Lowdore [1]. To see this, ascend to an opening in the grove, directly over the mill. It is the misfortune of this celebrated water-fall to fail entirely in a dry season. ...
[1] I do not know that the height of this cataract has been ascertained, but when viewing it, the reader may like to have it recalled to his mind, that Carver says, the fall of Niagara does not exceed 140 feet.
image WS21P197, button   goto source.
Addendum; From Dr. Dalton's descriptive poem enumerating the Beauties of the Vale of Keswick, about 1775
Page 197:-
   ...
   Let other streams rejoice to roar / Down the rough rocks of dread Lowdore, / Rush raving on with bois'trous sweep, / And foaming rend the 'frighted deep, ...
image WS21P198, button   goto source.
Page 198:-
   ...
   Horrors like these at first alarm, / But soon with savage grandeur charm, / And raise to noblest thoughts the mind; / Thus by thy fall, Lowdore, reclin'd, / The craggy cliff, impendant wood, / Whose shadows mix o'er half the flood, / The gloomy clouds with solemn sail, / Scarce lifted by the languid gale, / O'er the capp'd hill, and dark'ned vale:- ...
image WS21P204, button   goto source.
Addendum; Mr Gray's Journal, 1769
Page 204:-
... we turned aside into a coppice, ascending a little in front of Lowdore water-fall: the height appeared to be about 200 feet, the quantity of water not great, though (these three days excepted) it hath rained daily for near two months before; but then the stream was nobly broken, leaping from rock to rock, and foaming with fury. On one side a towering crag, that spired up to equal, if not overtop, the neighbouring cliffs (this lay all in shade and darkness) on the other hand a rounder, broader, projecting hill shagged with wood, and illuminated by the sun, which glanced sideways on the upper part of the cataract. The force of the water wearing a deep channel in the ground, hurries away to join the lake. ...
image WS21P212, button   goto source.
Page 212:-
... These [Stockghyll Force and High Fall, Rydal], when I saw them, were in full torrent; whereas Lowdore water-fall, which I visited in the evening of the very same day, was almost without a stream. Hence I conclude that this distinguished feature in the vale of Keswick, is like most of the northern rivers, only in high beauty during bad weather.
image WS21P224, button   goto source.
Mr Cumberland's Ode to the Sun, 1776
Page 224:-
   SOUL of the world, refulgent sun! / Oh, take not from my ravish'd sight / Those golden beams of living light, / Nor, ere thy daily course be run, / Precipitate the night. / Lo! where ruffian clouds arise, / Usurp the abdicated skies, / And seize the aethereal throne: / Sullen sad the scene appears, / Huge Helvellyn streams with tears! / Hark! 'tis giant Skiddaw's groan, / I hear terrific Lowdore roar; / The sabbath of thy reign is o'er, / The anarchy's begun; / Father of light! return; break forth, refulgent sun!
image WS21P227, button   goto source.
Page 227:-
   ...
   ... the Naiad [1]; she defies / The faithless echo, and her yelling cries / Howls on the summit of rude Lowdore's brow; / Then with a desperate leap, / Springs from the rocky steep, / And runs enamour'd to the lake below. / ...
[1] This alludes to the great water-fall at Lowdore.

placename:- Lowdore Waterfall
other name:- Lowdore
date:- 1769; 1775; 1776; 1778
period:- 18th century, late; 1760s; 1770s

old print:- Pearson 1900s

Guide book, Pearson's Gossipy Guide to the English Lakes and Neighbouring Districts, published by C Arthur Pearson, Henrietta Street, London, 1900s.
thumbnail PS1E61, button to large image
Print, halftone photograph, Lodore, Looking up the Cataract, Borrowdale, Cumberland, published by C Arthur Pearson, Henrietta Street, London, 1900s.
On p.166 of Pearson's Gossipy Guide to the English Lakes and Neighbouring Districts.
printed at bottom:-
LODORE, LOOKING UP THE CATARACT
date:- 1900=1909
period:- 1900s

old print:- Sylvan 1847

thumbnail SYL140, button to large image
Print, engraving, Lodore Cascade, Borrowdale, Cumberland, drawn by Gilks, published by John Johnstone, Paternoster Row, London, et al, 1847.
On p.168 of Sylvan's Pictorial Guide to the English Lakes.
printed at bottom left, centre:-
[ ] Gilks / LODORE CASCADE.

placename:- Lodore Cascade
date:- 1847
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Heywood 1906

Guide to Keswick and its Vicinity, in the Penny Guide Books series, published by Abel Heywood and Son, 56-58 Oldham Street, Manchester, and by Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent and Co, Ave Maria Lane, Paternoster Row, London, 1906.
thumbnail HW1E08, button to large image
Print, halftone, Lodore, the falls, Borrowdale, Cumberland, from a photograph by H Bell, Ambleside, published by Abel Heywood and Son, 56-58 Oldham Street, Manchester, and by Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent and Co, Ave Maria Lane, Paternoster Row, London, 1906.
In a Guide to Keswick and its Vicinity in the Penny Guide Books series.
printed at bottom:-
Photo by / LODORE. / H. Bell, Ambleside.
date:- 1906
period:- 1900s

old print:- Loftie 1875

English Lake Scenery, by W J Loftie, with chromograph illustrations by T L Rowbotham, published by Marcus Ward and Co, 67-68 Chandos Street, Covent Garden, London, and Belfast, 1875.
thumbnail LF1E03, button to large image
Print, engraving, Cataract of Lodore, Borrowdale, Cumberland, drawn by EMW, engraved by J Cooper, published by Marcus Ward and Co, 67-68 Chandos Street, Covent Garden, London, and Belfast, 1875.
On p.15 of English Lake Scenery, by W J Loftie.
printed at lower left, right, centre:-
EMW / J. COOPER Sc. / CATARACT OF LODORE.

placename:- Cataract of Lodore
date:- 1875
period:- 19th century, late

old print:- Garnett 1850s-60s F

Set of prints, engravings, Views of the English Lakes or Views in the English Lake District, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, 1850s-60s?
thumbnail GAR705, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Waterfall at Lowdore, Cumberland, drawn and engraved by William Banks and Son, Edinburgh, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, 1850s-60s?
Included in Views of the English Lakes.
printed at bottom:-
Drawn & Engd. by W. Banks & Son, Edinr. / WATERFALL AT LOWDORE.

placename:- Lowdore Waterfall
date:- 1850=1869
period:- 19th century, late

old print:- Harwood 1842

Set of prints, uncoloured engravings bound in a booklet, Harwood's Views of the Lakes, drawn by John and Frederick Harwood, 26 Fenchurch Street, London, about 1842.
thumbnail HRW215, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Lodore, Cumberland, engraved and published by John and Frederick Harwood, 26 Fenchurch Street, London, 1842.
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
London, J & F. Harwood, 26, Fenchurch Street. / Sepr. 27, 1842. / Lodore, Cumberland.
date:- 1842
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Rose 1832-35 (vol.1 no.59)

Engravings - Westmorland, Cumberland, Durham and Northumberland Illustrated; from drawings by Thomas Allom, George Pickering, and H Gastineau, described by Thomas Rose, published by H Fisher, R Fisher, and P Jackson, Newgate Street, London, 1832-35.
thumbnail PR0022, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Lowdore Cataract, Cumberland, drawn by Thomas Allom, engraved by J C Bentley, published by Fisher, Son and Co, London, 1833.
vol.1 pl.59 in the set of prints, Westmorland, Cumberland, Durham and Northumberland Illustrated. The falls in spate.
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
T. Allom. / J. C. Bentley. / LOWDORE CATARACT, CUMBERLAND. / FISHER, SON & CO. LONDON, 1833.

placename:- Lowdore Cataract
date:- 1832=1835
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Rose 1832-35 (vol.1 no.35)

Engravings - Westmorland, Cumberland, Durham and Northumberland Illustrated; from drawings by Thomas Allom, George Pickering, and H Gastineau, described by Thomas Rose, published by H Fisher, R Fisher, and P Jackson, Newgate Street, London, 1832-35.
thumbnail PR0011, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Derwent Water, and Lowdore, Cumberland, drawn by H Gastineau, engraved by W le Petit, published by Fisher, Son and Co, London, 1832-35.
vol.1 pl.35 in the set of prints, Westmorland, Cumberland, Durham and Northumberland Illustrated.
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
H. Gastineau. / W Le Petit. / DERWENT WATER, & LOWDORE, CUMBERLAND.

placename:- Lowdore
date:- 1832=1835
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Farington 1816 (plate 19)

Set of prints, 43 engravings, The Lakes of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Cumberland, drawings by Jospeph Farington, with text by Thomas Hartwell Horne, published by T Cadell, and W Davies, Strand, and by J M'Creery, Black Horse Court, Fleet Street, London, 1816.
thumbnail PR0447, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, View on the Road from Keswick to Borrowdale, drawn by Joseph Farington, engraved by F R Hay, published by T Cadell and W Davies, Strand, London, 1815.
Barrow House? and Lodore Falls, etc etc.
Plate 20 in The Lakes of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Cumberland.
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
Drawn by J. Farington. / Engraved by F. R. Hay. / View on the Road from Keswick to Borrowdale. / London, Published Septr. 15, 1815, by T. Cadell & W. Davies, Strand.
date:- 1815
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Farington 1816 (plate 20)

Set of prints, 43 engravings, The Lakes of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Cumberland, drawings by Jospeph Farington, with text by Thomas Hartwell Horne, published by T Cadell, and W Davies, Strand, and by J M'Creery, Black Horse Court, Fleet Street, London, 1816.
thumbnail PR0449, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, East Side of Derwentwater looking towards Lowdore Waterfall, Cumberland, drawn by Joseph Farington, engraved by F R Hay, published by T Cadell and W Davies, Strand, London, 1815.
Plate 20 in The Lakes of Lancashire, Westmorland, and Cumberland.
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
Drawn by J. Farington. / Engraved by F. R. Hay. / East side of Derwentwater looking towards Lowdore Waterfall. / London, Published Septr. 15, 1815, by T. Cadell & W. Davies, Strand.

placename:- Lowdore Waterfall
date:- 1815
period:- 19th century, early

descriptive text:- Farington 1789 (plate 4)

20 engravings, Views of the Lakes in Cumberland and Westmorland, drawn by Joseph Farington, published by William Byrne, London, 1789.
thumbnail BMZ93, button to large image
Print, engraving, Lowdore Waterfall, painted by Joseph Farington, engraved by W Byrne and T Medland, published by W Byrne, 79 Titchfield Street, London, 1785.
Plate 4 from Views of the Lakes, &c, in Cumberland and Westmorland, published 1789.
Lodore fall in spate, between Gowder Crag and Brund Fell; with descriptive text:-
LOWDORE WATERFALL
IS generally esteemed one of the most striking Objects of the Kind in this country; its Accompanyments are uncommonly picturesque and grand. These indeed compose of themselves a Scene which cannot but interest the Spectator, even when the Fall of the Water, which depends upon the State of the Weather, is inconsiderable. The stupendous Craggs between which the Torrent precipitates itself broken into the boldest Forms, are shagged with Trees hanging every where in the most fantastic Shapes, from the Fissures of the Rock. The Height of the Fall itself Mr. Gray conjectures to be about two Hundred Feet. At some Distance above the Fall the Stream proceeds from a Lake about a Mile in Circumference. To this sequestered Spot Travellers are seldom conducted, though they might perhaps think themselves amply recompensed for their Trouble, by a Sight of the various romantic Circumstances which occur in this Excursion: The Lake and Village near it are called Wawtenleth. The Point from whence this View is taken is a little to the Right of the Road leading from Keswick into Borrowdale, near the Side of the Derwentwater, where it forms a small Bay. As these Engravings are offered to the Public as faithful Representations of Nature, it may not be improper to observe that the Permanency of the Resemblance is liable to be affected by the frequent Fall of Timber and Coppice Wood which takes place on the Borders of these Lakes. An Allowance will of course be made for any Variation of this Kind which may appear between the Plate and the Original.

placename:- Lowdore Waterfall
date:- 1785
period:- 18th century, late

old print:- Adams 1852

Guide book, Adams's Pocket Descriptive Guide to the Lake District, by Sir Edward Litt Laman Blanchard, illustrated by F G Delamotte, published by W J Adams, 59 Fleet Street, London, 1852.
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Print, engraving, Keswick Lake and Lowdore Fall, by F G Delamotte, published by W J Adams, 59 Fleet Street, London, 1852.
Tipped in opp.p.59 in Adams's Pocket Descriptive Guide to the Lake District.
printed at lower right:-
F DELAMOTTE
printed at bottom:-
KESWICK LAKE AND LOWDORE FALL.

placename:- Lowdore Fall
date:- 1852
period:- 19th century, late

old print:-
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Print, uncoloured engraving, Lowdore Waterfall, Borrowdale, Cumberland, by ?B Foster, engraved by E Evans, 1850s-60s?
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
[B] Foster / LOWDORE WATERFALL

placename:- Lowdore Waterfall
date:- 1850=1869
period:- 19th century, late

old print:-
thumbnail PR0413, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Scott's Lodore Hotel, Derwentwater, published by J Scott, Lodore Hotel, Cumberland,
Viewed from the lake side. The reverse side has an advertisement for the hotel:-
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... The celebrated Falls of Lodore are in the Private Grounds at the rear of the Hotel. Parties not staying at the Hotel must have permission from the Proprietor to view the Falls and Grounds. ...
Scott's Lodore Hotel, Derwentwater
date:- 1870=1879
period:- 19th century, late

old print:-
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Print, chromolithograph, Lodore Falls, Derwentwater, Cumberland, published by T Nelson and Sons, London, 1900s?
From a set of prints, The Scenery of the English Lakes
printed at lower right:-
T. NELSON & SONS
printed at bottom left:-
LODORE FALLS, DERWENTWATER

placename:- Lodore Falls
date:- 1900=1909
period:- 1900s

old print:- Lowther 1780s-90s

Scrapbook, 4 volumes, of descriptive texts, maps, and prints of views and coats of arms, for Westmorland and Cumberland, assembled by a member of the Lowther Family, late 18th early 19th century.
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Print, engraving, Waterfall at Keswick, presumably Lodore falls, Borrowdale, Cumbria, published by F Blyth, 87 Cornhill, London, 1775.
date:- 1785
period:- 18th century, late

hearsay Robert Southey wrote The Cataract of Lodore, 1820:-


Old Cumbria Gazetteer - JandMN: 2013

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