button to main menu   Old Cumbria Gazetteer
site name:- Helvellyn
parish St John's Castlerigg and Wythburn parish, once in Cumberland
parish Patterdale parish, once in Westmorland
county:- Cumbria
viewpoint; station
Altitude 3100 feet
coordinates:- NY342150
10Km square:- NY31

1Km square NY3415

old print:- Otley 1823 (4th edn 1830)

Guidebook, Concise Description of the English Lakes, later A Description of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, published by the author, Keswick, Cumberland, by J Richardson, London, and by Arthur Foster, Kirky Lonsdale, Cumbria, 1823 onwards.
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Print, engraving, outline view, Some of the Western Mountains as seen from Helvellyn, published by Jonathan Otley, Keswick, Cumberland et al, 1830.
p.57 in A Concise Description of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, 4th edition, 1830.
printed at top:-
Some of the Western Mountains: / as seen from Helvellyn.
printed at bottom:-
Wetherlam / Old Man - Coniston Fell / Carrs, or Scars / Gray Friar / Black Combe / Crinkle Crags / Bowfell / Scawfell Pike / Great-end Crag / Glaramara / Great Gable / Kirkfell / Pillar Fell / Honister and High Crag / High Stile / Dalehead and Red Pike / Robinson / Blake Fell / Witeless Pike / Grasmoor / Ill Crags / Grisedale Pike
date:- 1830
period:- 19th century, early

old print:- Otley 1823 (5th edn 1834)

Guidebook, Concise Description of the English Lakes, later A Description of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, published by the author, Keswick, Cumberland, by J Richardson, London, and by Arthur Foster, Kirky Lonsdale, Cumbria, 1823 onwards.
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Print, woodcut outline view, A Group of Mountains, seen from Helvellyn, by Jonathan Otley, Keswick, Cumberland now Cumbria, 1834.
Printed on p.63 of A Concise Description of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, 5th edition, 1834.
printed at top:-
A GROUP OF MOUNTAINS, / Seen from Helvellyn, looking to the South-West.
printed at bottom:-
Holm Fell / Old Man - Coniston Fell / Wetherlam / Carrs, or Scars / Gray Friar / Black Combe / Harrison Stickle / Crinkle Crags / Bowfell / Hanging Knot / Scawfell Pike / Hindside / Great-end Crag / Glaramara / Great gable / Green Gable / Kirkfell / Pillar Fell / Honister, and High Crag / High Stile / Dalehead, and Red Pike / Hindscarth, and Robinson / Blake Fell / Witeless Pike / Grasmoor / Ill Crags / Causey Pike / Grisedale Pike
date:- 1830
period:- 19th century, early

descriptive text:- Otley 1823 (5th edn 1834)

Guidebook, Concise Description of the English Lakes, later A Description of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, published by the author, Keswick, Cumberland, by J Richardson, London, and by Arthur Foster, Kirky Lonsdale, Cumbria, 1823 onwards.
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Page 58:-
HELVELLYN
Affords a more complete geographical display of the lake district than any other point within its limits: several of the lakes may be viewed from thence, and the mountains in every direction appear in a most splendid arrangement; while from the south to the western part of the horizon, the distant ocean may be discerned through several of the spaces between them.
...
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Page 60:-
...
The ground towards the summit forms a kind of moss-clad plain, sloping gently to the west, and terminated on the east by a series of rocky precipices; and here the prospect on every side is grand beyond conception. Considerable portions of the lakes of Ullswater, Windermere, Coniston, and Esthwaite, with several of the mountain tarns, are to be seen. Red Tarn is seated so deeply below the eye, that, compared with its gigantic accompaniments, it would scarcely be estimated at more than half its actual dimensions. To the right and left of Red Tarn, the two narrow ridges called Striding Edge, and Swirrel Edge, are stretched out in the direction of the lamina of the slaty rock, of which this part of the mountain is composed; other parts being of chert or hornstone, resting upon porphyritic greenstone. Beyond Swirrel Edge lies Keppel-cove Tarn; and at the termination of the ridge rises the peak of Catsty-cam, modernized into Catchedecam, or Catchety-cam. Angle-tarn, and the frothy stream from
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Page 61:-
Hays Water, may be seen among the hills beyond Patterdale: and more remote, the estuaries of the Kent and Leven, uniting in the wide bay of Morecambe, and extending to the distant ocean. Chapel Isle is an object in the Ulverston channel; and a small triangular piece of water, near the middle of Windermere, serves as a direction to the town and Castle of Lancaster, which are sometimes visible from hence. The sea, circumscribing the western half of the Lake district, from Lancaster sands to the Solway Frith, is here and there visible between the peaks of the distant mountains; each portion in succession reflecting the sun's rays to the eye of the spectator, as the luminary descends towards the western horizon.
On the banks of Ullswater, Hallsteads, the beautiful summer retreat of John Marshall, Esq. occupies a prominent station. From the foot of the lake the vale of Eamont leads towards Brougham-Hall and the ruins of the ancient Castle near it. The cultivated country about Penrith is bounded by a chain of mountains, topped by the lofty Crossfell; to the right of which, are high grounds separating Westmorland from Durham and Yorkshire; and further still to the right, the crowned head of Ingleborough stands conspicuous. Black Combe - in the distance beyond Wrynose - fills up the space between the fells of Coniston and Langdale; Crinkle Crags and Bowfell are exceeded in altitude by the Pikes on Scawfell; and on the opposite side of Sty-head, the Gable rears his head to a considerable
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Page 62:-
elevation. The Isle of Man appears to be raised up to the top of Kirkfell, the distance of more than forty miles between them being overlooked.
The Pillar of Ennerdale holds a respectable station; and the mountain beyond Buttermere, with its three protuberances, High Crag, High Stile, and Red Pike, rises behind Honister Crag and the Dalehead of Newlands. Grasmoor and Grisedale Pike look well up among their neighbours, while Skiddaw and Saddleback abate nothing of their importance on being viewed from this elevation. The mountains of Scotland, seen beyond the Solway Frith, fill up the distance; and nearer to our station, High Street, Ill-bell, Fairfield, and many other neighbouring eminences, ought not to be overlooked. Place Fell, and other mountains of Martindale, rise boldly beyond Ullswater; but those towards the foot of Hawes Water present less variety of outline.
By travelling along the ridge, to a little distance each way, a variety of prospects may be enjoyed; which those who return directly leave unseen. On proceeding a little northward, one of the islands on Windermere comes in view; and at the lower or northern man, the lakes of Thirlmere and Bassenthwaite: by deviating a little to the westward we see a small portion of Grasmere; and by following the edge of the precipice southward, better views of Patterdale present themselves;
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Page 63:-
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Page 79:-
STATION III.- HELVELLYN.
Latitude 54° 31′ 43″ N. Longitude 3° 0′ 24″ W. Height 3070 feet.
date:- 1823
period:- 19th century, early; 1820s

old print:- Otley 1823 (8th edn 1849)

Guidebook, Concise Description of the English Lakes, later A Description of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, published by the author, Keswick, Cumberland, by J Richardson, London, and by Arthur Foster, Kirky Lonsdale, Cumbria, 1823 onwards.
thumbnail O80E17, button to large image
Print, engraving, outline view of mountains, A Group of Mountains seen from Helvellyn, looking towards the South West, drawn by Mr Binns, Halifax, engraved by Mr Jewitt, Headington, Oxfordshire, published by Jonathan Otley, Keswick, Cumberland et al, 1849.
Opposite p.50 of A Descriptive Guide of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, 8th edition, 1849.
printed at bottom:-
A GROUP OF MOUNTAINS SEEN FROM HELVELLYN: - / Looking towards the South West.
printed at top:-
Old Man - Coniston / Wetherlam (line 2) / Carrs, or Scars / Grey Friar / Black Comb / Harrison Stickle (line 2) / Crickle Crags / Bowfell / Hanging Knot / Scawfell Pike / Great End / Lingmel / Glaramara / Great Gable / Green Gable / Kirkfell / Seatallan / Yewbarrow / Hay Cock / Pillar / Steeple / Honister (line 2) / High Crag / High Stile / Red Pike / Robinson / Melbreak / Blake Fell / Whiteless Pike / Grasmoor / Ill Crags / Whiteside / Causey Pike (line 2) / Grisedale Pike
Looking WSW; 90 degree view, SSW to WNW
coordinates:- NY342150
date:- 1849
period:- 19th century, early

source:- Otley 1818

New Map of the District of the Lakes, in Westmorland, Cumberland, and Lancashire, scale about 4 miles to 1 inch, by Jonathan Otley, engraved by J and G Menzies, Edinburgh, Lothian, Scotland, published by J Otley, Keswick, Cumberland now Cumbria, 1818; pblished 1818 to 1850s.
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HELVELLYN

placename:- Helvellyn
hill

hearsay You might see a Brocken Spectre from the top of Helvellyn, when a low sun casts your shadow on mist lying below. The shadow is exactly your size, but the effect of perspective makes the shadow, at a distance, appear huge.

Old Cumbria Gazetteer - JandMN: 2013

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©  Martin and Jean Norgate: 2014
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